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Anyone dry--sumped their Coyote-based engine?

Speaking of, got my ARA dry sump oil tank today. REAL nice unit. Perfect pairing for the machining of the Dailey pump and pan. I went with 3 gallons and the low profile vent port. Billy at Dry Sump Solutions emailed me to check in on the project, clarify some bits, and even offered to customize my post-order without any hassle. Highly recommend!

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5,493
6,498
The Camaros were running dry sumps way back in the Grand Am days because those LS motors couldn't live without one. They had a carve out in the rules to allow it, while the Boss 302s used a wet sump very successfully.
When we went PWC racing, dry sumps were allowed, and used by everyone with a blue oval.
The wet sumps ran an accumulator that stored oil pressure, we cut a cooler line in the bus stop at Daytona, and all the blinks things didn't go off until in the banking, the driver clicked the engine, coasted into the pits, with no loss of oil pressure, according to the ECM.
An HPDE or competition car in a lower class, I would have no issue with a decent wet sump, but ultimately, especially with low or no oil pressure engines, the dry sump is the way to go.
 

captdistraction

GrumpyRacer
1,936
1,664
Phoenix, Az
The Camaros were running dry sumps way back in the Grand Am days because those LS motors couldn't live without one. They had a carve out in the rules to allow it, while the Boss 302s used a wet sump very successfully.
When we went PWC racing, dry sumps were allowed, and used by everyone with a blue oval.
The wet sumps ran an accumulator that stored oil pressure, we cut a cooler line in the bus stop at Daytona, and all the blinks things didn't go off until in the banking, the driver clicked the engine, coasted into the pits, with no loss of oil pressure, according to the ECM.
An HPDE or competition car in a lower class, I would have no issue with a decent wet sump, but ultimately, especially with low or no oil pressure engines, the dry sump is the way to go.

when my wet sump failed, my accusump gave me about 4 seconds of usable oil pressure - but I mistakenly had the light wired after the check valve for the accusump so I didn't react until the accusump had emptied. I think for the wet sump folks using an accumulator, if you have a warning light make sure its before the accumulator circuit
 

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