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Brake Fluid flush

This this the first time I am changing/flushing a brake fluid in any car.
I have been researching and watching multiple videos about this procedure.
Is there anything I need to know about the Boss?
Order of bleeding?
What fluid are guys using?

I already have DOT 4 put in by the dealer around April 2013
But I am participating in a Porsche Club HPDE and they require a fresh brake fluid within 2 months of the event

Here is what I am planning to buy
http://www.harborfreight.com/brake-fluid-bleeder-92924.html

Thanks
 
Don't waste your money on that Harbor Freight bleeder. I bought one a few years ago. It seems to spray out a fine mist of brake fluid in the exhaust air, which is just awesome for your paint job. :eek:

You are better off with either a hand vacuum pump like a Mity Vac or just the old school method of pumping the brake pedal. If you do the latter method, Speed Bleeders (or other similar brand of one-way valve brake bleeders) are helpful, but not necessary if you have a helper pump the pedal while you close off the bleed nipple at the bottom of the pedal stroke.
 
13Boss#3328 said:
Is there anything I need to know about the Boss?
When bleeding the fronts there are two bleeder valves, start with the inside then the outside bleeders

Order of bleeding?
Start with the RR, LR, RF and LF last.

FWIW many of us will not touch a speed bleeder type tool. The only way and the right way for us is the old fashion two people method. One in the car steeping on the pedal and the other with an 11MM wrench at each wheel.
 
3,806
3,745
FWIW back in the vette days they were a huge PITA to bleed, I used to jack the car up, open the the bleeders and go to lunch, jack the front up to bleed the rears and visa versa. Put pans under the calipers, they would finally get fluid to them and then you could pedal bleed them the rest of the way without a problem..but when they were dry......duuude.
 

mcmmotorsports

Resident Mental Patient
I just did my fluid swap.
Use a turkey baster to remove all the fluid from the reservoir. Put it in a 1 liter plastic bottle
Fill with fresh fluid,
Drill a hole in the cap of the water bottle.
Use some clear plastic tubing, you can get it from Walmart in the aquarium dept.
Make sure the tube stays submerged in the fluid in the bottle.
Attach one end to the bleeder screw, you may need a different size hose to adapt to the screw.
Making sure reservoir is never, EVER run dry, Open LF first, pump pedal slowly 7-10 times. Close bleeder screw move to next one.
RF next, followed by the LR, RR.
For regular bleeding I use a $51.99 Power Bleeder from Jegs and just don't fill it with fluid, use the air pressure. Works flawlessly.
 
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On the fronts isn't the outboard side bled first since it is furthest from the master cylinder? That is how I do it anyway.
 

mcmmotorsports

Resident Mental Patient
When bleeding the brakes, you would be correct I do the right rear first followed by the left rear then the right front then the left front. However, we are flushing the fluid so you want to go to the closest caliper to the master first.
 
Just make sure you keep an eye on the reservoir so it does not go dry and get air into the ABS module. I have been told you need to visit a dealer at that point so they can get the ABS to actuate while bleeding to get out the bubbles. Not sure if that is 100% true, though.
 
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WHen I had my 2011 GT I had the brake lines open for days when I was changing over shocks, struts, springs, Brembo bbk, etc. I thought I was gonna have to visit the dealer for air in the ABS module too. I bled the brakes and had an ok-feeling pedal. Took the car out and slammed on the brakes numerous times to get the ABS to kick in, then rebled the system. All was well.
 
jlwdvm said:
On the fronts isn't the outboard side bled first since it is furthest from the master cylinder? That is how I do it anyway.

Being this was my first car with the duel bleeder valves I looked at figured the inside first. That was mainly to see if any air was near that bleeder. I only do one or two pumps there and then move to the outside screw to completely flush the caliper. I asked several different techs while at the local Grand Am races if I was doing this correct and the all agreed it was the way they do it. I'm not sure if it makes a big difference doing it the way you mentioned but when able I try to follow what the race teams do.

WinterSucks said:
Just make sure you keep an eye on the reservoir so it does not go dry and get air into the ABS module. I have been told you need to visit a dealer at that point so they can get the ABS to actuate while bleeding to get out the bubbles. Not sure if that is 100% true, though.

I have heard this a million times but never seen an actual case of air in the ABS causing problem or not flushing out, it's an old wives' tale. I have had the master empty in my car at least one without problem. I watch at the roar before practice teams swapping master cylinders and other brake parts followed by someone opening a bleeder screw while someone else is stepping on the pedal, it's that simple.
 

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