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New boss owner

Are you operating under any kind of budget? If so, then I'd spend the money on the essentials first: brake pads, brake fluid, brake ducts (because your brakes are the absolute last thing you want failing on your car at a track event), Whiteline transmission bushing insert (the Blowfish Racing bracket looks like a real cure for the problem but the bushing insert is an order of magnitude less expensive and may prove sufficient -- it has for a number of people -- and it's available now), and maybe a rear differential overflow catch can to keep gear oil from spilling onto the track (even if that doesn't ruin your day, it could easily ruin someone else's). I'd wait before doing anything else because anything beyond that is going to depend on the shortcomings you find, and that requires seat time.

You can go crazy spending money on upgrades to the car, but what you have is already phenomenal, as anyone who has been to the Boss Track Attack will tell you.


If autocross is going to be your primary use, then power is not going to be your limiting factor. Even on the track, these cars put down a lot of power, enough that it'll take some getting used to if you haven't tracked anything with this amount of power before, and yours already exceeds what these cars put out stock.

The reason I didn't mention any cooling modifications in the above is that these cars have thermal protection built into the computer, and you certainly won't be overheating the engine in an autocross. If you find yourself going into limp mode at the track, then it's time to look at cooling mods (from other threads on this forum, it appears that an air-to-oil cooler is the most effective modification in that respect), but otherwise, just change your oil very regularly and stick with 5W50.
 
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kcbrown said:
Are you operating under any kind of budget? If so, then I'd spend the money on the essentials first: brake pads, brake fluid, brake ducts (because your brakes are the absolute last thing you want failing on your car at a track event), Whiteline transmission bushing insert (the Blowfish Racing bracket looks like a real cure for the problem but the bushing insert is an order of magnitude less expensive and may prove sufficient -- it has for a number of people -- and it's available now), and maybe a rear differential overflow catch can to keep gear oil from spilling onto the track (even if that doesn't ruin your day, it could easily ruin someone else's). I'd wait before doing anything else because anything beyond that is going to depend on the shortcomings you find, and that requires seat time.

You can go crazy spending money on upgrades to the car, but what you have is already phenomenal, as anyone who has been to the Boss Track Attack will tell you.


If autocross is going to be your primary use, then power is not going to be your limiting factor. Even on the track, these cars put down a lot of power, enough that it'll take some getting used to if you haven't tracked anything with this amount of power before, and yours already exceeds what these cars put out stock.

The reason I didn't mention any cooling modifications in the above is that these cars have thermal protection built into the computer, and you certainly won't be overheating the engine in an autocross. If you find yourself going into limp mode at the track, then it's time to look at cooling mods (from other threads on this forum, it appears that an air-to-oil cooler is the most effective modification in that respect), but otherwise, just change your oil very regularly and stick with 5W50.

aahh .. :D thank you sir !! ,, the clutch lines I found a couple of brands with different price.. Man im crazy boss 302 addict price is not an issue for the best of parts for my baby ,,,What are this differences between the brands ?
 

steveespo

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Keep the 1 7/8" headers. Bigger is better on the airflow with these engines. The old 2 valve pushrod engine rules of thumb do not apply to the coyote. The flow of the cylinder heads is almost twice that of a GT40 small block head on both intake and exhaust. You also spin the engine to 7500 rpm, the volume of gases that have to enter and exit at that engine speed is much larger than a 6000 rpm motor.
Steve
 
Even if you are not tracking, replace that brake fluid first. I have used a power breeder from Motive successfully by myself instead of one guy pumping and one bleeding and both telling back and forth trying to coordinate... but you will spend around 80 foot the bleeder. Buy the "black label" one for newer Gm and Ford three-tab reservoirs. Also think of getting a tune from AED to take advantage of the headers. A CAI does get some gains but I don't know if it it's the best hp/$ mod. You already have pleeennnty of power stock. I think the headers are good for 40-50 gains at the wheels with a tune. But an intake and headers combined might add more than both simply added on paper.
 
eng90 said:
aahh .. :D thank you sir !! ,, the clutch lines I found a couple of brands with different price.. Man im crazy boss 302 addict price is not an issue for the best of parts for my baby ,,,What are this differences between the brands ?

Well, I certainly understand that you want to get the best for your car. I would want the same! The question, though, is whether or not you have a limited amount of money to spend. If it's essentially unlimited (tens of thousands of dollars), then there's no need to hold back. But if it's limited, then you have some decisions to make about how to spend what you have.

The reason is that making the car better won't do you much good if you can't also take advantage of it by taking it to the track or autocross regularly. And which mods matter depends on where you're going to track your car, under what conditions, etc., and how much track driving you'll do in comparison with autocross. If you're compromising your track or autocross budget (for consumables such as pads and tires, as well as entry fees, lodging costs, etc.), then you're far better off spending the money on your track/autocross budget, because then you'll at least be using the car the way it was meant to be used.

And then there's the question of how you're going to be using the car. For instance, if you're going to spend most of your driving time at the autocross, with maybe one or two open track sessions per year, then I'd definitely skip the cooling system upgrades, because chances are you're simply not going to need them (you most certainly won't at the autocross). If, on the other hand, you'll primarily be tracking the car, then I'd pay more attention to the cooling system.

Since you already have the 1 7/8" headers, I'd just keep those. The guys at Vorshlag report that the larger diameter headers get you better power and torque across the board, at least with the Coyote engine, and I wouldn't expect that to be any different for the Boss engine (if anything, the Boss engine should be able to make even better use of the larger diameter headers because of the higher flowing heads and the higher redline).


More than anything, make sure you have plenty of money to use on the fundamentals: entry fees, lodging, consumables, and safety (mainly, brake reliability, but also the axle overflow reservoir. I like the Bob's Auto Sports reservoir myself).


Oh, one other required item: camber plates! If you don't get anything else for your suspension, get those. They'll save you a bunch of money on your front tires. The Vorshlag plates are particularly good.
 

steveespo

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Good post Mr Brown (Reservior Dogs reference inserted here), like you say many of the mods talked about here are really track only and the benefits will only be realized when using the car at high speeds and high g situations.
DOT 4 brake fluid is the #1 mod everyone should do if planning any track or auto x driving. #2 is higher grade pads and cooling ducts. #3 Caster/Camber plates. These three items will let you get the most out of the stock Boss platform without impacting its street manners at all. After that the sky is the limit, sticky tires would be the next bang for the buck, then the compromise in street ability will start.
PS. Welcome to BMO kc.
Mr White.
 
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Thanx for the response guys , thats really helpful

My plan for now is ss clutch line. Is there difference between the brands ?

Im also going to put on jpc breathers, caster/camber plates is important thanx forpointing it out !

Also i think toyo r888s will be good for what i want .

Im w8ing for the blowfish bracket to be on stock, i think its most beneficial for our trans shifts

Brake ss braided lines ??
 
At least two of the vendors here sell Stop Tech and Goodridge brake lines. Vorshlag makes their own. I have not installed mine yet so I cannot say how well they fit. Someone else will have to chime in on fitment but they are all quality parts.
 

steveespo

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Braided lines from either stop tech or Goodridge are both high quality but not crucial. All depends on budget, tell us what you are looking to do and spend over the next week, month and 6 months and we can give you a good plan.
Speed costs, how fast do you want to spend?
Steve
 
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steveespo said:
Braided lines from either stop tech or Goodridge are both high quality but not crucial. All depends on budget, tell us what you are looking to do and spend over the next week, month and 6 months and we can give you a good plan.
Speed costs, how fast do you want to spend?
Steve

This weekend im planing to buy stuff to try to eliminate the any trans issues as much as i can , jpc breathers , maybe gt500 axlebacks for this month

By next month ill do tyres, proper tune from hypermotive, caster/ camber plates and sways if they make difference in autocross .

Since brakelines will not make that brake firmness change then ill do another things too .. Probably pads and disk brakes.. And that is like after 3 months .

Budget wise, im willing to pay for the best , but for now im really pleased with the car's stance and the car's suspension just makes my day !! , the car has jlt cai and arh 1 7/8 headers with catted x . Maybe a throttle body with the tune by next month donno .. It depends if the throttle body does make difference or not

I'm glad that ur helping me out, really appreciate it
 

Grant 302

basic and well known psychic
I'd pass on the JPC breathers, unless you want oil dripping down your coil covers. Get either the JLT style filter for the passenger side or 302S style catch can.

Welcome to the site! It's nice to see Bosses are all over the world! :)
 
eng90 said:
This weekend im planing to buy stuff to try to eliminate the any trans issues as much as i can , jpc breathers , maybe gt500 axlebacks for this month

The one mod you can make right now that will make the most difference in the shifter by far is the Whiteline transmission bushing insert. It's the only modification, aside from the Blowfish Racing bracket (which isn't available yet as far as I know) that works towards addressing the root cause of the problem.

It's inexpensive enough that it's going to be worth getting even if it's not the ultimate solution. I strongly recommend you get it, install it, and see what it does for the shifter. You can remove the bottom tongue of the insert without affecting the effectiveness of the insert, and minimize the NVH increase that comes from the use of the insert.


By next month ill do tyres, proper tune from hypermotive, caster/ camber plates and sways if they make difference in autocross .

Again, aside from camber plates, do not touch the suspension until you have driven the car for a while and have identified what you believe to be its weaknesses. To do anything else is to effectively be shooting blind. The stock suspension is already quite excellent. Trust me, you will be impressed with just how good it is unless you're already used to driving race cars.


Since brakelines will not make that brake firmness change then ill do another things too .. Probably pads and disk brakes.. And that is like after 3 months .

The Boss 302 has low-expansion brake lines already. The only reason for going with stainless lines is longevity, and even that isn't necessarily going to be better with braided stainless lines. Hence, you really don't have anything you need to do on that, either.


Budget wise, im willing to pay for the best , but for now im really pleased with the car's stance and the car's suspension just makes my day !! ,

Then don't change it! Just get camber plates. Leave the rest of the suspension alone.


the car has jlt cai and arh 1 7/8 headers with catted x . Maybe a throttle body with the tune by next month donno .. It depends if the throttle body does make difference or not

I'd go with the tune first and see how the car behaves after that, before changing anything else.

Honestly, changes like this need to be done in a stepwise fashion. Changing a bunch of things at one time is a sure way to keep yourself from knowing what really made the difference. Even worse, it keeps you from knowing what you could really get. Hence, get the tune first, and see how the car behaves with that. Then, if (and only if) you feel the car is still lacking power (it certainly won't be for autocross! Probably won't be for the track, either), then make further changes at that time.

One other thing to keep in mind: the more power you make, the more demands will be placed on the cooling system. Hence, I really advise that you proceed slowly and deliberately with this, and test your changes at the track.


If you haven't taken your car to the track, then after doing the basics (pads, brake fluid, brake ducts, camber plates), you really should take the car to the track and discover for yourself just how good your car really is. You will be very impressed. Frankly, I'm so impressed with my car (2014 GT with track package and Recaro seats) that I don't feel I need to change anything except camber plates, but since doing that requires essentially the same labor as installing coilovers, I'm going straight to coilovers in a couple of months (mainly to address some NVH on the road, but I may as well get some handling improvements along the way. I've computed spring rates that should maintain the current balance of the car and will be starting off with that). But that's only after having gotten a decent amount of seat time in the car.


If you approach this slowly and deliberately, then not only will you wind up with something that is better than you'd otherwise get and for less money, you'll have more fun in the process.
 
steveespo said:
Good post Mr Brown (Reservior Dogs reference inserted here), like you say many of the mods talked about here are really track only and the benefits will only be realized when using the car at high speeds and high g situations.
DOT 4 brake fluid is the #1 mod everyone should do if planning any track or auto x driving. #2 is higher grade pads and cooling ducts. #3 Caster/Camber plates. These three items will let you get the most out of the stock Boss platform without impacting its street manners at all. After that the sky is the limit, sticky tires would be the next bang for the buck, then the compromise in street ability will start.
PS. Welcome to BMO kc.
Mr White.

Thanks very much for the warm welcome, Mr. Espo! (gotta keep in form here... :D ).

Pad selection is going to be the most difficult decision for the basics here. My choice so far has been the Stoptech street performance pads. They have a MOT of 1300 degrees, apparently have a nice slow falloff after that point, and are very inexpensive (about a quarter of the price of anything substantially better, that I've seen: $70 for a set of front pads from Amazon!). So far they have not failed me, but I do have to admit that I may be a bit easier on the brakes than some, generally hitting around 0.8G in deceleration (the car is capable of 1.1G for that). Then again, braking earlier and for longer than necessary is supposedly actually harder on the pads, so I may actually be working them more than necessary. I do have brake ducts, so I'm sure that helps to keep the temperatures under control.

How hard you wind up working the brakes depends on the track. So far, I've been to two: Sonoma Raceway, and Laguna Seca. Laguna was much harder on the brakes because the speeds you hit are that substantially higher (going into turn 2, and also going into turn 5). Thunderhill is coming up at the end of this month, and I expect it'll be a great workout for both the brakes and the cooling system.

My choice of fluid is Castrol SRF, because it's a fluid that you can put into the car and then not have to touch it for a while. It's expensive, but that apparently won't faze the OP, and in any case, that expense may actually be illusory, in that while it may cost more up-front, it may wind up being no more expensive after accounting for its longevity. Like the OP, I have no problem paying for quality, and SRF seems to be that. Nothing else that I've seen touches its wet boiling point.
 
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When my trans internals need replacement, is there any aftermarket parts that r done for mt82 to beef up the transmission ??

I've heard about revauto parts that beef up the trans internals, i dont know what the r the parta though

Any info may be helpful big time in the future
 
eng90 said:
When my trans internals need replacement, is there any aftermarket parts that r done for mt82 to beef up the transmission ??

I've heard about revauto parts that beef up the trans internals, i dont know what the r the parta though

Any info may be helpful big time in the future

From what I've read, Liberty Gear is a good place for that. Apparently they will strengthen some of the internals more than they already are, though apparently what's in there is already very good from a strength standpoint. They may have some rebuilt transmissions on hand already.

Frankly, if your transmission starts to give you problems and you're past the warranty stage, you may as well upgrade to the Tremec Magnum XL transmission and be done with it. That will take care of multiple problems at the same time: the shifter alignment issue, any strength issues, etc. Liberty apparently sells those, and there are other vendors as well.

However, chances are good that you'll never get to that point. Most of the MT-82 issues arose before the 2013 model year. Nothing's perfect, of course, but I expect you won't have any troubles.


Honestly, I wouldn't even bother to think about things like this unless/until you notice a real problem with your car.


I know you're eager to spend money lavishly on your car. Trust me, you'll have much more fun if you spend it on track events!
 
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Guys pls tell me whats the recommended camber plate , i will order my parts soon .. Maybe on this weekend !! :D

So for changing that mushy brake feeling , brake pads and fluid will solve that out ??
 
eng90 said:
Guys pls tell me whats the recommended camber plate , i will order my parts soon .. Maybe on this weekend !! :D

So for changing that mushy brake feeling , brake pads and fluid will solve that out ??

The best fix for mushy brakes is SS brake lines. Changing to more aggressive pads will change brake pedal modulation, which may fix what your describing as mushy (depending on new pad characteristics).

As for camber plates, on this forum the MM plates seem to be the most popular, followed by vorshlags ($$$) and ground control.
 
F.D. Sako said:
The best fix for mushy brakes is SS brake lines. Changing to more aggressive pads will change brake pedal modulation, which may fix what your describing as mushy (depending on new pad characteristics).

The Boss 302 already has low-expansion brake lines. Are those known to result in a mushy pedal anyway? I admit that stainless lines might be better, but I'm skeptical that there is going to be a substantial difference (else, why would Ford have bothered with low-expansion lines in the first place?).


As for camber plates, on this forum the MM plates seem to be the most popular, followed by vorshlags ($$$) and ground control.

The Vorshlags are arguably the most overengineered ones on the market. As the OP doesn't seem to mind spending the extra cash to go with the absolute best he can get his hands on, those would probably qualify here...

Also, the support from Vorshlag is really excellent in my experience, though the same may also be true of Ground Control and Maximum Motorsports (I don't have experience with either of those companies yet).
 

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