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Prevent stripped calipers - bleeder inserts

It's funny you mention this. Just took my calipers apart last night so I can install new seals. I had purchased one of these https://www.pegasusautoracing.com/productdetails.asp?RecID=5210 a while ago just to see if it would work. It looks like they will not work as they would need to be the next size bigger pipe thread. Now what you posted looks to be they way to go. It will be a bit more expensive though. Mine have not stripped yet but I planned on doing this as preventive maintenance.
 
That's a great idea and there have been a couple of BMO members that have stripped these out.
 
I installed them after my issues at the Glen. Remember those fun times, Mike! Haven't had an issue since. The smaller bleeders tighten up really well inside the inserts.
 
Sako: I did not use loctite but it couldn't hurt. The threads are the same as a bleeder so they seal well. Teflon tape might be ok too.

Steve: they are the correct size. They are not tapered but they do not need to be. The bottom of the insert has a small hole where the point of new (small) bleeder will seat and seal. They're nice machined pieces that eliminate the possibility of over tightening bleeders.
 
They use of teflon on Hydraulic brake fittings is a bad idea. The fluid and heat may break down the tape. If you want to use a sealant that has excellent properties and resists more types of fluids and gases look at X-Pando. I'm a plumber and use this on all my threads no matter what type of material is being used. If you apply a sealant correctly you will not have a problem. With out a sealant on threads being straight or tapered you run the risk of a leak. The key is to use the correct sealant and amount.
Also, One that fits the type of fluid and pressures that its sealing.
But, your car your call.

http://www.xpando.com/xpando.php
 
I personally haven't used sealant or Teflon tape, but I don't see what the harm could be? Speed Bleeders, for instance come with a pre-applied sealant on the threads. As for the Teflon tape, if it were to break down, I'd think it would be such a small amount that it wouldn't cause any real harm if it mixed with the fluid. I realize it's not ideal but the risk is probably less than running with a leaking threads.
 

TMSBOSS

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KBBOSS1086 said:
I personally haven't used sealant or Teflon tape, but I don't see what the harm could be? Speed Bleeders, for instance come with a pre-applied sealant on the threads. As for the Teflon tape, if it were to break down, I'd think it would be such a small amount that it wouldn't cause any real harm if it mixed with the fluid. I realize it's not ideal but the risk is probably less than running with a leaking threads.

I have had a issue with Teflon tape "Migrating" to places you do not want it. Example, small piece stuck in the needle valve and seat of the carb on my 69 Corvette. Caused a over rich issue. If a piece floated through the system and interfered with master cylinder sealing, there could be a problem.
 
TMSBOSS said:
I have had a issue with Teflon tape "Migrating" to places you do not want it. Example, small piece stuck in the needle valve and seat of the carb on my 69 Corvette. Caused a over rich issue. If a piece floated through the system and interfered with master cylinder sealing, there could be a problem.

Very good point. I was thinking it would liquify and mix with the fluid, but I now see the potential issue if it remains solid.
 

Grant 302

basic and well known psychic
KBBOSS1086 said:
I personally haven't used sealant or Teflon tape, but I don't see what the harm could be? Speed Bleeders, for instance come with a pre-applied sealant on the threads. As for the Teflon tape, if it were to break down, I'd think it would be such a small amount that it wouldn't cause any real harm if it mixed with the fluid. I realize it's not ideal but the risk is probably less than running with a leaking threads.

In addition to the potential for clogging the system or causing a leak by getting between sealing surfaces, any sealant in the threads could mask a leak at the conical seat. I don't want that on my cars.

Ironically, you are citing one reason why I didn't buy Speed Bleeders.
 
So there is no confusion, the inserts do not require any sealant or tape. I've used them for several track days now and have not seen a spec of fluid leakage. After 2 caliper's stripping at the track last year I will never again run an aluminum caliper on a track car (or any car with regular bleeding being done) without inserts. $80 is really not too much when you consider the cost of 2 caliper's and event in expense if it were to happen at the track like it did to me. I can say from experience it is not easy finding a stock caliper for our cars at the local Ford dealer when you or in a rush.
 
Ordered a set as well. Few years ago I thought I stripped mine, but turned out it was dirt stuck under the bleeder screw, which scoured the tapered edge of the caliper a little.
 

Grant 302

basic and well known psychic
KBBOSS1086 said:
So there is no confusion, the inserts do not require any sealant or tape. I've used them for several track days now and have not seen a spec of fluid leakage. After 2 caliper's stripping at the track last year I will never again run an aluminum caliper on a track car (or any car with regular bleeding being done) without inserts. $80 is really not too much when you consider the cost of 2 caliper's and event in expense if it were to happen at the track like it did to me. I can say from experience it is not easy finding a stock caliper for our cars at the local Ford dealer when you or in a rush.

Agree with this 100%, and thanks for the suggestion! These inserts are way better and safer than any sealant solution wether permanent or for a temporary fix.
 

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