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Rotor Life, Brake Vibrations - GT350 - New to the Track Life

1
0
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
Under 3 Years
Virginia
I have a lot of feeback/vibration in the steering wheel when braking and I have a couple of questions regarding rotor life, pad changes, and if you can re-bed the rotors. I was hoping someone could share some knowledge with me. I have tracked my GT350 about 12 or so days now and have a total of about 5,000 miles ont eh rotors and car (but it is three and half years old and sits outside). Last year I was soloed with FAAT (Summit Point) and run my car hard and I am heavy on the brakes as the end of Summit Point Main as I am generally going from 140s down to about 50 in a short distance and run decent lap times. Almost all of my track time is at Summit Point Main, two days on the Shenandoah Circuit (also at Summit Point), and two two days at VIR, one on the full course and one on the grand course. I figured this may help with the questions below.

At the end of first set of OEM pads I was starting to get some serious feedback in the steering wheel under light to moderate braking but were fine under full load. Eventually the brakes were worn out and I was getting the vibration under heavy braking and I swapped out the pads for another set of OEMs. After bedding in the new pads, everything was back to normal for about two track days. Then I took everything off and did a brake clean and flushed all fluids and everything was good for about 3 more sessions (not even a full track day). Now I have about 30-40% pad life left and the vibration are back with a fury.

Sorry for the long story so here are the questions:

1. Should I try to rebed the brakes to see if it scrubs them clean so I can finish out the brake pads or is this not even possible?
2. Should I replace the rotors (I have a fresh set of OEM rotors) and use old brake pads?
3. Should I replace the rotors and install the new Carobtech (XP20) pads I have waiting?
4. Should I replace the pads and use the new Carbotech pads on the old rotors? I am not sure if this will scrub them clean but I don't want to mess up the new pads (if this is possible).

I just want to make sure I don't mess up the new rotors or the new brakes pad by doing something stupid. I was also curious roughly how many track days people are generally getting out of OEM rotors. I appreicate everyone helping a newbie.
 
I have a lot of feeback/vibration in the steering wheel when braking and I have a couple of questions regarding rotor life, pad changes, and if you can re-bed the rotors. I was hoping someone could share some knowledge with me. I have tracked my GT350 about 12 or so days now and have a total of about 5,000 miles ont eh rotors and car (but it is three and half years old and sits outside). Last year I was soloed with FAAT (Summit Point) and run my car hard and I am heavy on the brakes as the end of Summit Point Main as I am generally going from 140s down to about 50 in a short distance and run decent lap times. Almost all of my track time is at Summit Point Main, two days on the Shenandoah Circuit (also at Summit Point), and two two days at VIR, one on the full course and one on the grand course. I figured this may help with the questions below.

At the end of first set of OEM pads I was starting to get some serious feedback in the steering wheel under light to moderate braking but were fine under full load. Eventually the brakes were worn out and I was getting the vibration under heavy braking and I swapped out the pads for another set of OEMs. After bedding in the new pads, everything was back to normal for about two track days. Then I took everything off and did a brake clean and flushed all fluids and everything was good for about 3 more sessions (not even a full track day). Now I have about 30-40% pad life left and the vibration are back with a fury.

Sorry for the long story so here are the questions:

1. Should I try to rebed the brakes to see if it scrubs them clean so I can finish out the brake pads or is this not even possible?
2. Should I replace the rotors (I have a fresh set of OEM rotors) and use old brake pads?
3. Should I replace the rotors and install the new Carobtech (XP20) pads I have waiting?
4. Should I replace the pads and use the new Carbotech pads on the old rotors? I am not sure if this will scrub them clean but I don't want to mess up the new pads (if this is possible).

I just want to make sure I don't mess up the new rotors or the new brakes pad by doing something stupid. I was also curious roughly how many track days people are generally getting out of OEM rotors. I appreicate everyone helping a newbie.
It's odd that this is happening - I have a few questions that might help us help you:

What range of coaching have you had? Have you been trained in techniques like trail braking?

Have you had to come to a full stop as you're coming off the track, where you might have sat waiting for something with your foot on the brake?

Do you do a cool-down lap?

Sorry if your skills are way past all this, but the pulsing brake sounds like a pad deposit problem, and that's usually more about technique than it is about the equipment.
 

TMSBOSS

Spending my pension on car parts and track fees.
5,836
2,835
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
5-10 Years
Illinois
If your budget permits, dump the old and put in the new.
You may get away with cleaning and rebedding, maybe.
At 30-40% pad thickness, there ain’t much left there.
Inspect the calipers, swap pads and rotors.
 
1,072
861
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
5-10 Years
Philly Metro Area
For track use, these are done. I run past 50% and then change the pads.
This is not only good advice since you don't want to run out of pad before the end of your day, but also because the thinner pad will allow more transfer of heat to your calipers. This will degrade your dust boots and seals. More importantly, it will increase the probability that you will boil your brake fluid.
 

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