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To mod or not to mod... That is the question...

What is the general modding opinion on these cars? I'm curious. I came to the Boss from an '11 5.0 and I was modding the heck out of it. I think that is what GTs are for (my opinion). But to me, special editions and Shelbys have always been different, and I've always felt a little "dirty" when I think about or see mods done to them, if that makes sense. A big part of me wants to keep this car bone stock (intend to keep forever), keep it "pure". But a small part of me wants to add some side rocker splitters, lower the car a little, add some new wheels, and throw some Borla axle backs on there.

In the end, whoever is paying for the car ought to decide what they want to do, and it is their call - do what makes you happy, I get that. I'm just curious what other Boss owners opinions are on modding this car. :)

KG
 
I am adding the Roush side splitters to mine. I have added clear bra and window tint. I may make additional mods but that will depend on if I really get into the auto-x racing or not. I love drag-strip 1/4 mile stuff. So depending on which way I go with the car i will add mods to make that type of racing more fun..
 
I think it really depends on what mods you are actually doing when it comes to whether people think it's a good idea or not. And it really depends on whether or not you think you might sell it at some point in the future. Granted, I don't see these cars as being big money makers any time soon..not the reason I bought mine..but with limited cars, a lot of times the stock ones are the ones worth more cause everyone else has done all the mods to theirs.

Plenty of people have modded theirs already. 5 DOT 0 has a new spoiler and wheels. I have different axle backs. I know of a couple people looking to throw a blower on theirs. My opinion is that it is your car so do with it what you will and if people don't like it...who cares. Myself...being 27...I don't really have the money to do much else to the car other than the axle backs, so I suppose it is a good thing I am content with just that for now :) Plus, I don't need any more power, this car is ridiculous for street driving as is(which btw is AWESOME). I would like to lower my car for the looks of it, but around here that would mean I couldn't pull into some parking lots because they have an incline going into them.
 
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A quick story. I grew up racing foxbodies in the early 90's and absolutely lusted after the 93 Cobra when it was released. Years later I purchased a stone stock, perfect example. The car was so perfect that I could not mod it and didn't even want to drive it much for fear of chipping the paint etc. I eventually sold the car as I needed the space more than a car that I really didn't enjoy owning. The weirdest part of this is that the car wasn't even worth much. I later went out and purchased a driver quality car which I still own today and get to fully enjoy.

Moral of the story: We buy these type of cars to drive hard, mod and enjoy them for the machines they are. If keeping a car totally stock means you will enjoy it more than do that but if not, mod it. I think people get way to caught up in the collectability angle when it will be a long time (likely never) before the cars are worth anything.

So the answer is mod it. Also, don't save the stock part as they can be sold for more mod money Grin
 
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GA
This debate goes on at the Bullitt forum too. Some people believe the car loses the character when you mod it, and others just want to make it their own and don't care. The safe way to mod is to do things that are reversible and keep the stock parts if you think you will ever sell it. When you buy a car that is specially engineered like the Boss, Bullitt, Shelby, etc, I think you should leave it alone for the most part. If you want to do major modding, buy a GT and go wild. The main reasons behind my feeling this way are 1) can you do a better job than the people who engineered the car without screwing it up, and 2) you are throwing money away that you already paid for upgraded parts and marketing hype.
 
PJWANNABE said:
This debate goes on at the Bullitt forum too. Some people believe the car loses the character when you mod it, and others just want to make it their own and don't care. The safe way to mod is to do things that are reversible and keep the stock parts if you think you will ever sell it. When you buy a car that is specially engineered like the Boss, Bullitt, Shelby, etc, I think you should leave it alone for the most part. If you want to do major modding, buy a GT and go wild. The main reasons behind my feeling this way are 1) can you do a better job than the people who engineered the car without screwing it up, and 2) you are throwing money away that you already paid for upgraded parts and marketing hype.
Gotta disagree with you on buying a GT for modding vs. the Boss. Just because the Boss has special engineering doesn't mean you can't improve on it. A lot of cars don't contain the best or most you can get out of them because of reasons related to marketability and profits. Read the in-depth article on the Roadrunner engine in 5.0 Mag and you'll see Ford had constraints/limitations to work with. Another example is why would Ford use stock GT exhaust rather than Flowmaster, Borla, etc.? I agree with Mark. Do what you want within your personal constraints in regard to finance, creativity, and taste.
 
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STIG302 said:
PJWANNABE said:
This debate goes on at the Bullitt forum too. Some people believe the car loses the character when you mod it, and others just want to make it their own and don't care. The safe way to mod is to do things that are reversible and keep the stock parts if you think you will ever sell it. When you buy a car that is specially engineered like the Boss, Bullitt, Shelby, etc, I think you should leave it alone for the most part. If you want to do major modding, buy a GT and go wild. The main reasons behind my feeling this way are 1) can you do a better job than the people who engineered the car without screwing it up, and 2) you are throwing money away that you already paid for upgraded parts and marketing hype.
Gotta disagree with you on buying a GT for modding vs. the Boss. Just because the Boss has special engineering doesn't mean you can't improve on it. A lot of cars don't contain the best or most you can get out of them because of reasons related to marketability and profits. Read the in-depth article on the Roadrunner engine in 5.0 Mag and you'll see Ford had constraints/limitations to work with. Another example is why would Ford use stock GT exhaust rather than Flowmaster, Borla, etc.? I agree with Mark. Do what you want within your personal constraints in regard to finance, creativity, and taste.

Most times it is about how much money you have. For someone like me I look at it more as what I can afford vs. performance. My dealer salesman had a customer that bought a new GT, dumpled 30K in Ford Racing parts and labor into it, then decided it didn't come out the way he wanted it, and then sold it to him for 30K. Sure, the Boss can be improved as well as the GT500. If you can afford to buy one of those and dump another 20K into it, more power to you. There is a guy on the Bullitt forum that has put over 60K into his and it is one hell of a Mustang.
 
Once you mod any special edition of any car you have now changed it's intended purpose for being built the way it was. So what was the point in buying that particular car?
 
orng302 said:
Once you mod any special edition of any car you have now changed it's intended purpose for being built the way it was. So what was the point in buying that particular car?
One of the most overlooked benefits of the greatest country on this planet, because you can! You are free to buy what you want and do what you want to it within personal limitations and the law. It doesn't get any better than that. I've probably posted this before, but for me, I was going to get a 3-4 year old Shelby and mod it before the Boss showed up. Now, I'll probably just slap some Borlas or Roush axle-backs on there and then wait until the warranty on the power train runs out before I consider anything else. I probably won't do a blower until a lot of others have tested them over time. I bought this car to enjoy and personalize.
 
Freedom to do what you wish is not the issue here, altering a special edition of something (in this case a car) is what I don't get. It's your car and money you can burn it if you wish.
 

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