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WTB: Trailer Toad

This is the first time seeing one of these. Not sure I would put one on my vehicle. How can this be stable? A get the tongue load sharing. How does this extra hinge not make the trailer unstable?
Using “dollies” on trailers is nothing new. Hell, many mid-America states allow semis to to tow more than one trailer in a similar fashion. There’s nothing about an extra pivot point in the middle would create instability.

Additionally, removing all of the tongue from the RV is a lot more stable and greatly reduces stress on the extended frame. These things are pretty big in the drag racing community.
 

JDee

Ancient Racer
974
852
halfway between Mosport and Shannonville
W2W Racing
20+ Years
Can you back that up? I would think not unless it's solid on one side. And even then the binding would be horrendous wouldn't it?
It's kind of like a car dolly and from my understanding you can't back them up either. Tractor trailer trains come in A and B up here, B Trains have 5th wheels on both trailers and a good driver can back one up, A Trains have a dolly converter and God himself can't back them up.
 

TMSBOSS

Epic Contributor
5,535
2,495
Illinois
HPDE
5-10 Years
States that allow multiple trailers restrict the use to specific highways Because of stability issues. Additional training and certs are required to pull these loads. Why?? Stability, risk etc.. From what I have read, the only requirement to add this equipment to your rig is the cash to do it. Don't get me wrong, I take risks. In this case, I think I would simply buy the right rig to start with.
I did a quick search and found nothing related to testing done on the addition of the "Lift" this unit adds to the back of the RV. Not for me today.
 
Can you back that up? I would think not unless it's solid on one side. And even then the binding would be horrendous wouldn't it?
It's kind of like a car dolly and from my understanding you can't back them up either. Tractor trailer trains come in A and B up here, B Trains have 5th wheels on both trailers and a good driver can back one up, A Trains have a dolly converter and God himself can't back them up.
yeah. They have pins to “lock out” the pivoting. Backs up like any normal trailer setup.

States that allow multiple trailers restrict the use to specific highways Because of stability issues. Additional training and certs are required to pull these loads. Why?? Stability, risk etc.. From what I have read, the only requirement to add this equipment to your rig is the cash to do it. Don't get me wrong, I take risks. In this case, I think I would simply buy the right rig to start with.
I did a quick search and found nothing related to testing done on the addition of the "Lift" this unit adds to the back of the RV. Not for me today.
Lift?

These are nothing new—whether this specifically or the idea. The physics are proven and they’re much safer to tow with than a standard bumper pull.
 

TMSBOSS

Epic Contributor
5,535
2,495
Illinois
HPDE
5-10 Years
The oldest reference to the Toad is 18 months old. Its new.

Lift. There are wheels which hold the toad up. When the rear of the RV dips, these wheels then "Lift" the rear of the RV. What effect dose this have on the frame of the RV?
 
I don’t have any pics of one dealing with a dip, but yes they pivot. It doesn't add more stress to the back. It takes all of the vertical load off the tow rig.

And this specific company has been around for 15 years. The idea much longer. And I've personally been familiar with them for about 5 years. Just never needed my own because I didn't have my own RV at the time.

 
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carver

breaker of wrenches
276
331
ontario
Just my 2 cents. I have over forty years and 100k miles of active trailer towing including everything from 34 ft. travel trailer, dump trailer's, flat bed's, boat trailers, car hauler's, utility trailers and more, all over North America. IMHO a well maintained and properly loaded, secured and balanced trailer with a weight distributing hitch is all you should need. :)
 
Just my 2 cents. I have over forty years and 100k miles of active trailer towing including everything from 34 ft. travel trailer, dump trailer's, flat bed's, boat trailers, car hauler's, utility trailers and more, all over North America. IMHO a well maintained and properly loaded, secured and balanced trailer with a weight distributing hitch is all you should need. :)
I hear that. I have a similar number of miles under my belt towing (although not the decades :)), and my personal experience shows that if you can get the weight off a rear bumper of an RV, it'll tow better. With a 24ft trailer and a 30ft RV, the axles are just too far apart and the geometry and physics get a bit wonky. These little guys are a great way to make it safer to tow--more stability, less stress, etc.

I wouldn't use only a WD hitch on a longer Class C as that will most definitely lift the rear end and put a lot of stress on the extended frame. The WD hitch I use currently towing the trailer with the truck frequently lifts the rear end of the truck up when going through dips and the rear axle is only 2ft from the hitch. With the 8-10ft distance on the RV, I would be concerned about the extra stress.
 
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carver

breaker of wrenches
276
331
ontario
Absolutely go with your gut. 🙂
I just added up all the cars, trucks, tractors and trailer tires that I still own at 48....yikes that's a lot of rubber to keep inflated.... and I'm suppose to be retired!! o_O and I still want to add slicks for the Boss !
 
Absolutely go with your gut. 🙂
I just added up all the cars, trucks, tractors and trailer tires that I still own at 48....yikes that's a lot of rubber to keep inflated.... and I'm suppose to be retired!! o_O and I still want to add slicks for the Boss !
Ha. That's a lot of tires. Get some slicks for that boss. The purple crack will change your life :)
 

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