The Mustang Forum for Track & Racing Enthusiasts

Taking your Mustang to an open track/HPDE event for the first time? Do you race competitively? This forum is for you! Log in to remove most ads.

  • Welcome to the Ford Mustang forum built for owners of the Mustang GT350, BOSS 302, GT500, and all other S550, S197, SN95, Fox Body and older Mustangs set up for open track days, road racing, and/or autocross. Join our forum, interact with others, share your build, and help us strengthen this community!

M5300-T Springs and Suspension Question

Hey Guys,

Just some general questions as I am not a suspension expert. I'm thinking of getting the M5300-T springs. I don't track the car, at least not yet. I just love driving my Boss every day and taking her to shows and stuff.

I've put springs on my 350Z and base Mustangs before to help improve looks and handling. But all I've ever done was the springs.

Here are my questions:

1. Do I need or should I upgrade any other suspension components when installing the springs? I don't want to add stress or wear to any other suspension component or tires or alignment issues.

2. Does swapping out the springs null any factory warranty concerns?

3. Should I have Ford do the install or a performance shop?

4. Any other tips and advice when doing the swap?
 
I went with the P springs as I was done waiting for Ford to come out with the specific Boss ones. I ended up switching the control arms, bought relocation brackets, PHB and brace. I don't think all of these are required for street driving but they have definitely improved the street and track handling. If you ever think you may go to the track I would buy these items along with the springs, take it to the track before and then after to really appreciate the investment.
 

Grant 302

basic and well known psychic
Darth Boss said:
Here are my questions:

1. Do I need or should I upgrade any other suspension components when installing the springs? I don't want to add stress or wear to any other suspension component or tires or alignment issues.

2. Does swapping out the springs null any factory warranty concerns?

3. Should I have Ford do the install or a performance shop?

4. Any other tips and advice when doing the swap?

1. Need to upgrade...No. It's just a good time if you plan on it anyway. For a street car, you might want to have the upper mounts 'flipped' to reduce the amount of negative static camber. With the additional 1/2" drop in the front you should have about -1.5 degrees of camber, which may be too much for a car that's driven 100% on the street.

2. I'd say the risk for warrantee issues is low or non-existant. Yet if your front strut were to fail for other reasons, then it could be an issue. I wouldn't worry about it myself since it's a Ford Racing part.

3. Depends on your relationship and reputation of your dealer. I'd check locally for their competence and how they handle performance upgrades.

4. If you do it yourself or find a friend to help...it's pretty easy to swap springs. Just don't loose the bearings in the upper mount. I use an O2 sensor socket for the top nut.
 
Darth Boss said:
Hey Guys,

Just some general questions as I am not a suspension expert. I'm thinking of getting the M5300-T springs. I don't track the car, at least not yet. I just love driving my Boss every day and taking her to shows and stuff.

I've put springs on my 350Z and base Mustangs before to help improve looks and handling. But all I've ever done was the springs.

Here are my questions:

1. Do I need or should I upgrade any other suspension components when installing the springs? I don't want to add stress or wear to any other suspension component or tires or alignment issues.

2. Does swapping out the springs null any factory warranty concerns?

3. Should I have Ford do the install or a performance shop?

4. Any other tips and advice when doing the swap?

To answer your questions...

1. The FRPP T springs are supposedly designed to work with stock Boss suspension components. However, you may want to at least install an adjustable panhard bar to center the rear axle which may be off center slightly after you have the lowering springs installed. As for rear LCAs, front LCAs, camber plates, etc... probably worth doing if you're going to be tracking your Boss a lot, but for mostly street driving, don't think I'd worry about it and save my money for other things. Others may disagree, though.
2. Can't see how it would affect your warranty, with the caveat that you never know what a particular dealer might do.
3. Any competent performance or auto repair shop should be able to do the install no problem. Although it's somewhat time consuming, it's not particularly difficult even for the "driveway" mechanic to tackle if you want to save on labor cost, which could run you ~$400 or more depending on labor rates.
4. Enjoy the new lowered stance and drive it!
 
Someone posted either here or on another forum that they spoke to FRPP rep and was told by them that no changes were needed to your car to run these springs. I would believe that to be true, although I would do as recommended and get the car aligned after install. I just ordered mine a few minutes ago, literally, and will have mine aligned after install. I plan to do them myself and will post any issues I come across while doing so.

Now for my opinion as a professional driving instructor to a potential student at a track event: Changing your springs is fine, even if you only want the look they provide. Changing anything else on the suspension for a guy who will be new at this is a waste of your money. You will be so overwhelmed by everything going on that you won't notice any "benefit" these other changes MAY give you. I am not a fan of changing parts for people who really should just focus on consistency with driving at a high level. I can't tell you how many times I have seen a "track prepped" car get passed, and in some cases lapped, by a stock vehicle driven well by a competent driver.

In the end though, it is your car and if you want to spend the money on these things, it is your decision. The single most important thing to change before a track day is brake fluid to a quality DOT 4 fluid. Enjoy your Boss, and I hope you do track it some day, it's GREAT!
 
LostPony said:
Someone posted either here or on another forum that they spoke to FRPP rep and was told by them that no changes were needed to your car to run these springs. I would believe that to be true, although I would do as recommended and get the car aligned after install. I just ordered mine a few minutes ago, literally, and will have mine aligned after install. I plan to do them myself and will post any issues I come across while doing so.

Now for my opinion as a professional driving instructor to a potential student at a track event: Changing your springs is fine, even if you only want the look they provide. Changing anything else on the suspension for a guy who will be new at this is a waste of your money. You will be so overwhelmed by everything going on that you won't notice any "benefit" these other changes MAY give you. I am not a fan of changing parts for people who really should just focus on consistency with driving at a high level. I can't tell you how many times I have seen a "track prepped" car get passed, and in some cases lapped, by a stock vehicle driven well by a competent driver.

In the end though, it is your car and if you want to spend the money on these things, it is your decision. The single most important thing to change before a track day is brake fluid to a quality DOT 4 fluid. Enjoy your Boss, and I hope you do track it some day, it's GREAT!

Excellent advice...unfortunately the money I was going to spend on the springs is now going to be spent on a deductible. Was in a minor fender bender this afternoon. Details in the general forum :( Sad day...
 
I have the M-5300-T springs and the Hotchkis adjustable panard rod on order from Summit ( springs are $50 less than Ford + free shipping). Intent is better handling and less off road look.

In general when lowering by the 35mm (slight axle offset to left side) rear and 15mm front there will be slight toe (out), camber (more neg.) Also has some effect on bump steer but best result is the lowering center of gravity of the car which brings quicker turn-in. I have done many Mustangs the FRPP Track Packs (suggested for street and occasional track use) with good results, generally a 4 wheel alignment is recommended. Most racers (maybe all) will crank in more neg. camber and toe out (better for cars that tend to over steer). Of course if you don't care how your cars handles daily drives and want ultimate handling there are other ways to go.

Other mods are x-brace, 302S grill, brake cooling and trans scoop, and of course Track-key.
 
Hey guys. One more question. I to my springs and Maximum Velocity recommended possibly installing a set of camber bolts giving more tolerance with alignment. May or may not be able to align within spec without the bolts.

Anyone know if this is necessary with the T springs?
 
Grant 302 said:
It probably wouldn't hurt to have a set of camber bolts on hand...just in case. Are you planning to flip the upper mount?

I guess I don't really know. Not sure what that does exactly. Can you elaborate?

I'm also debating letting my body shop do this work or if I should let a performance shop like Maximum Velocity do the work. I'm having some body work done from a minor accident, it would be easier and less expensive. But now I have some doubts about it being 100% right. One of the owners I believe owns a 2012 Boss.
 

Grant 302

basic and well known psychic
The upper mounts are slightly eccentric, and they are installed at the factory with the arrows facing out which increases the negative camber. Some people with lowered cars install the top mounts with the arrows facing in to decrease the negative camber, most often when using lowering springs. The adjustment is approximately +.75* camber. The main benefit to this mod is that nothing needs to be purchased. The front struts can be dismounted, the top mounts rotated 180* and reinstalled. Re-align the front end and you're done.

I do my own front end alignments, so I don't really know about having body shops do alignments...but off the cuff, I wouldn't do that...even though the owner has a Boss.
 
Grant 302 said:
The upper mounts are slightly eccentric, and they are installed at the factory with the arrows facing out which increases the negative camber. Some people with lowered cars install the top mounts with the arrows facing in to decrease the negative camber, most often when using lowering springs. The adjustment is approximately +.75* camber. The main benefit to this mod is that nothing needs to be purchased. The front struts can be dismounted, the top mounts rotated 180* and reinstalled. Re-align the front end and you're done.

I do my own front end alignments, so I don't really know about having body shops do alignments...but off the cuff, I wouldn't do that...even though the owner has a Boss.

Thanks...that makes a lot of sense.

The question I raised about who to do the work was not about the alignment. It was whether I should let my body shop install the springs, alignment done by an alignment shop.

Or do I have the performance shop install and do the alignment?

The body shop will have to do an alignment as a precaution because of the minor collision that is being repaired. Easier to have them do the work while everything else is being done. Plus they have to align anyway.
 

TMO Supporting Vendors

Top