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Thoughts on whether our Boss 302's will have future value.

I've read on a couple of forums people having heated discussions as to whether not these cars will be worth anything in the future. My thoughts are yes. With the Mustang being revamped after the the model year 2013, that will end the era of the Mustang as we know it. From what I understand it will be pretty much rebuilt from the ground up including independent suspension, 500hp, better gas mileage, and a more Euro lux interior, so it's able to compete directly in the world markets. That said, I think the Boss maybe the hail and farewell to the true Mustang as we know it, and the "see, we can make the live axle work". I know in the early 90's they had one model that had an independent suspension, I'm not sure which one it was off the top of my head. Wonder what happened with that? Anybody know how it handled? I sure don't, but I'm sure it was better then the old live axle setup on bumpy turns. Either way I'd like to hear what you guys or gals think.I''ll check back latter, Happy 4th.

PS. I can take criticism, if it's accurate. That's how I learn.Oh look, it time for a fun run! See ya.
 
We've heard the demise of the Mustang's and muscle cars before and here we are today. While I do believe the 2012 Boss 302 will retain more of it's value than the other 2012 Mustangs I don't think we'll see it appreciate like some of the early Shelby's or the 1969 and 1970 Boss and CJ cars. A friend of mine has a 1969 Mach I with a 428 CJ and it's worth double plus what a 1969 Mach I non CJ is worth. Now that was one heck of a $357 option! I bring this up because most of the valuable Mustangs and other muscle cars from years ago had a special engine in them, just like our Boss cars. Does that mean our Boss 302's are going to be valuable someday? No but it can't hurt. ;)

The thing that drives the prices up are the baby boomers wanting cars from their youth. The big question is will the youth of today pay high prices when they are adults with excess income to relive their youth? I suspect not.
 
Being that this is a "limited production" car, really engineered with performance in mind, I believe the BOSS will hold its value & increase in value down the road. Trackey adds to its appeal, but who knows, that technology may be available on many future cars to come. All I know is I'm going to enjoy driving my BOSS when I get it & my son may realize its future potential worth when it's passed on to him.
 
On a recent Dave Despain program on Speed, Carroll Shelby said, "Yesterday is history, tomorrow's a mystery, live for today." I think of that every time I get into my Boss. I took delivery on March 17 (coincidentally the day before my 36th birthday) and have put 4,200 miles on the car. With the exception of the time I ran over the back of a deer, every single mile has been incredible. Despite the front end groans, dash rattles, and a few other annoyances, this car is so damn fun to drive that I look forward to trips to the grocery store, taking my 17 month-old son to day care, and every other opportunity to hit the road. To me, this purchase was money well spent. Whether the car is worth anything by the time I get tired of driving it is irrelevant to me. More than anything, I hope that my son looks forward to driving it as much as I do (assuming we still use gasoline 16 years from now).
 
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IMHO it will be 30 years before collector value will bring any big money. Low miles original condition cars will bring the most money, but if you are driving it and enjoying it now then do it without worrying how much it will bring. Only the #1 and final # cars and pre-production cars in original condition will bring big money. All of the others in between will probably be worth 5-10K higher than the book value of a GT depending on the color scheme, options, miles, and condition for a long time.
 
I bought my car because I've never own a hot rod. I've had some nice car's but they have all been 4 door sedan's because I had kid's. Now they are going off to college and I don't need to worry about kid seats and family oriented functions it's Daddy time. I plan on driving my Boss only in summer and I plan on taking a trip to Summit point a couple of times and really push it, but I'm planning keeping until I die and hoped maybe it might be worth something someday, unless I kill myself in it then all bets are off. I told the wife it was an investment but didn't say it was monetary. She know it midlife and I bought it for my big 50 birthday in Aug. I found it to be quite fitting. Anyway thanks for everyone's input. I won't be sharing these post with me lady.
 

ufnavy06

Some say he has a tattoo of his face on his face.
I think what everyone has said about it being worth more than a GT based on options, etc, will be true. I honestly feel, at least initially, it'll hold it's value relative to the GT and the GT500. If they in fact limit it to 2012 and 2013 then other than the KR, it'll be the most sought after street legal Mustang of our generation. The Roush's, Saleen's, etc you can build so I don't think they'll do much better plus they are 'aftermarket' as in not from Ford's factory.

Also, you shouldn't be buying the car for it's financial value but for it's fun factor. Some may disagree but enjoy the car and worry about the price when it comes time to part with the car.
 
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My 2 cents,

I believe the BOSSES will always have a high interest/demand and good resale value, in the same way that the
FORD GT has retained its value and resale ability, even during these terrible economic times. Will they ever command
Barrett-Jackson type prices, I seriously doubt it.

I for one, will be enjoying my Boss as much as possible, and hope to get some track time in as well. I just feel like these cars will have the same appeal and value as the vintage race cars of the 60's. When you consider that there trackable practically right out of the box, and there built Ford Factory cars, its like there an instant classic.

Take good care of her, but also enjoy her too, life is short and you can't take it with you either.

Stef
 
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I plan on having my *forever* so I don't particularly care about values going forward. Desirability is the #1 driver of value. Rare and low mileage helps. I didn't think you'd ever see clean Ferrari Testarossa's going for less than what we paid for the Boss but there they are on ebay. Even those high dollar SCJ Mustangs lost much of their value in the early 70's before they recovered in the 80's. Buying low, selling high, and holding onto your cars for decades all work in your favor. My dad has a 1932 Ford Woodie station wagon that he bought for $250 in 1962. He just completed a 35 year resto that probably cost him $50k in today's dollars and it's now worth north of $100k. But he bought low and has had it for 50 years. In his favor, production was less than 1500 and they were wood bodied commercial vehicles so very, very few survived. He thinks between 1 and 2 dozen.

If you want to retain your Boss' value, keep it garaged and put very few miles on it. If you want to make money on one, wait several years until prices bottom then buy a low mile one. I'm happy just ripping around in it with an ultimate goal of keeping it under 100,000 miles.

Here's my dad's woodie. haha.
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52CLazTp1jw[/youtube]
 
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I'm sure we all know cars are generally a lousy investment. Best guess at this point: If you keep 'em clean, shiny and well maintained, the Bosses will always be desirable. It will take decades for them to appreciate beyond what we paid for them...probably some of us won't even be around when that day comes. But in 2055 they will probably still be worth some good money, so if you hang on to them they'll still be monetarily valuable.

In the meantime, with the innards they have they should be even more durable than a standard GT over time - ant that is saying a lot. So drive them, enjoy them, take good care of them - they should retain their value better than most vehicles - IMO
 
OMG the good investment thing. Cars are rotten investments. If I want to make money I put it into my business. That makes me money. I told my oldest son once, "when I die get rid of my 70 Boss as fast as you can. once the baby boomers are gone so is any value". AC Cobras and Boss 429s were good because they didn't make many and most were crushed. Trouble is now most cars get saved. I have a friend that bought a 2007 Shelby and said that was his kids collage fund. He just took a bath on it selling it. I have another friend that bought Shelbys 3 years in a row. Has a total of 58 miles on all three. I ask him how do you so that? My point, just buy a Boss because you love it and drive by a guy in a Prius and see how miserable he is.
 
BossLS,
I couldn't have said it any better myself. Collectors buy cars that have already attained a certain status. You don't buy one and not use it hoping to one day make a killing on it. Ask Jay Leno. I say, "Drive it like you stole it, with regular oil changes of course!" :D
 
The only investment a car is .Is your enjoyment using it ! What are you saving it for ?The next guy?
The guy who dies with the most mileage on his cars wins!
So far this season I got 1200 miles on my Ford GT ,2000 ON MY 2012 GTR.Boy when my 302LS arrives I hope to have a 1000 the 1st week!
Drive em and enjoy the ride !(To and from the track!)
Just my 02
 
Well, I gotta chime in on this one too :)

I agree with what everyone else has said: it will be worth more than a GT of a similar age. As the years pass, it will be worth considerably more than a GT of a similar age. Of course condition, miles, color and options will be a factor as well.

Look at other post-classic "limited" production Mustangs for examples;
- 79 Pace Car Mustang -> worth more than msrp in good condition, and alot more than a similar year fox car.
- 84 1/2 GT350 Mustang -> worth more than msrp in good condition, and alot more than a similar year fox car.
- 93 Cobra -> worth right around msrp in good, low miles, ORIGINAL condition, and quite a bit more than a similar year fox car.
- 94-2001 Cobra -> ...I can't really comment on these, but I'm sure they are worth more than similar year Mustangs.
- 2003 - 2004 Cobra -> currently at about 1/2 of msrp and worth quite a bit more than a similar year Mustang.
**arguably, some of these examples are the only versions considered "worth collecting" from thier era of production.

Where will the Boss be in 10 years? I'm guessing it will follow the trend of the 93 and 03 Cobras - it will be worth right around half of MSRP as as 10 year old limited production Mustang. Right around 15 years, the value will start to increase (looks at 93 cobra values), although I dont' if this is due to perceived value, or just inflation.
 
Future value??? Think of its value NOW! Hey, we all bought this car because we realized it was very special. In the future, with government regulations mandating more stringent controls on cars, cars will be much more lighter & V8's might become a thing of the past. I'm glad I'm getting this BOSS & don't plan on selling it any time soon....my son will make that decision when he gets it.
 
I think the biggest difference between what we consider classics now and these cars is the attempts to move away from oil. Where a 70 Boss can run on the same fuel that it ran on then, these cars may be obsolete.

My dad had many big block Mustangs back in the day and never thought they would be worth anything. If these cars are kept nice, they will retain their value in respect to standard GT's or V6's. In my opinion of course.
 
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- 94-2001 Cobra -> ...I can't really comment on these, but I'm sure they are worth more than similar year Mustangs.
- 2003 - 2004 Cobra -> currently at about 1/2 of msrp and worth quite a bit more than a similar year Mustang.
**arguably, some of these examples are the only versions considered "worth collecting" from thier era of production.

Where will the Boss be in 10 years? I'm guessing it will follow the trend of the 93 and 03 Cobras - it will be worth right around half of MSRP as as 10 year old limited production Mustang. Right around 15 years, the value will start to increase (looks at 93 cobra values), although I dont' if this is due to perceived value, or just inflation.
[/quote]I worked briefly at a Ford dealer in 2001, and the one I was at wouldn't sell Cobras because it required close to $50k investment in special tools (SVT?) to be able to service them. I'd think this would directly affect the market value of these cars as nice as they were. I had several opportunities to pick up one of them over the last 10 years or so and always passed owing to the uncertaintly of servicing or getting service for them.
 
I think that low mileage Bosses will retain at least 75% of their value and then possibly increase in value in 10 years .
 

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