Vorshlag 2018 Mustang GT + S550 Development Thread

Discussion in 'Vorshlag Motorsports' started by Fair, Mar 9, 2018.

  1. flyhalf

    flyhalf TMO Race

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    Awesome awesome awesome.
    Thanks Terry.
    Following your lead on mishi radiator
    I'd like
    To share some extra info.
    this is the MISHI vs pp1/shelby radiator.
    And the plate nets btw the 2.
    I test it on sonoma aug4th. [​IMG][​IMG]

    Sent from my LG-H932 using Tapatalk
     
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  2. Fair

    Fair Go Big or Go Home

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    Project Update for August 30th, 2019: The last update got cut short since we were so far behind in updates due to the 3 month forum outage. There are six more track and test events that we have done in our 2018 Mustang GT we have done since that post, as well as some new parts we have been testing.

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    Going to try and cover as much ground as possible in this post. We also have a new S550 chassis entering the shop, which we are already building for the 2020 season...

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    Yes, its a front hit rolling chassis. I will explain why we bought it and what we are going to do. Let's get started!

    NASA AT COTA, MAY 4-5, 2019

    This annual NASA event at Circuit of the Americas is always fun, but this particular weekend was pretty far from the perfect outing I had hoped we would see this year.

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    First I was a little bummed as we had to move to TT2, where we are 300 pounds overweight, or 47 whp under the limit, however you want to look at it. Its a shame as we would have dominated TT3 class both days, even on street tires. Still doing our "street tires on Saturday / R compounds on Sunday" testing for NASA weekends. Just cannot get back to TT3 without cutting the car or swapping in a different engine (could this be hints for things to come?) It is what it is.

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    The drive down Friday afternoon was rough. Hellish drive in traffic and heavy rains all the way down. The Friday test-and-tune day was wet all day, a total a wash, so I'm glad we didn't enter that. We lost count of how many crashed cars, car-b-ques, and wreckers we saw on the "3 hour drive" from Dallas, that took 5.5 hours.

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    It stopped raining by 6 pm when we finally got there, we unloaded the car and put it inside our garage, while very dark clouds were rolling in. We got out of there just before the skies OPENED UP. It rained for so long and hard that evening that the tunnels flooded and people inside the track got stuck there for many hours. Was hoping the forecast would clean up for Saturday.

    SATURDAY

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    Saturday morning, and its been raining all night, so the track is still wet. TT goes out first at 8 am, totally wet. I tried to start towards the front of the field but of course I had issues trying to get the AiM Solo to talk to the SmartyCam and fought with it during the entire out lap (see below left). Never did come on, so I was "flying blind". I hate driving on track with no CLUE how the lap times look. I live and die by my predictive lap timer. It was also wet enough to put up a spray in a lot of places (below right).

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    That first session was a mess - I let several cars go by on the out lap while I fidgeted with the AiM, then fought to re-pass these same cars in the later wet laps. The Video is unwatchable, as the AiM Solo and AiM SmartyCam were not playing well together. I stayed out longer than normal trying to get a clear lap, just kept getting blocked by formula cars and TTU cars, lap after lap.

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    After a lap and a half of passing cars and then filling the mirrors of some Corvettes, a gaggle of TTU cars finally pointed me by (above left). That was bad enough, then I got stuck behind a Elan DP-2 prototype that was on a leisurely Sunday drive in the corners, and he had juuuust enough grunt on the straights to block me from passing (he later ran a 2:20 laps in the dry on Sunday). This went on for an entire lap and a half, super frustrating, and I finally just made a pass braking on the inside of T1 just enough to get past him, then built a gap and pulled away in the esses. On street tires, in a 3800 pound car, with no aero. By then the diff fluid temps were pegged at 250°F again. I had made most of a clean lap, but finally gave up in traffic frustration and came in.

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    Turns out I had the 3rd quickest time of the session at 2:38.114, even with crazy traffic. The SmartyCam video is nearly unwatchable, the audio is a train wreck, and the lap counter and most of the data overlays never worked. I'm already sick of the SmartyCam, but we will try it again another weekend.

    Felt good gridding P3, but the wet conditions masked some setup issues. I went out in session 2 and it was dry, but the car handled something awful. Worst it has ever felt! Pushed like mad on corner entry, loose as hell on corner exit. I was pulling my hair out, driving sideways a lot, but at least the AiM was finally displaying my times - which were CRAP. Ran a 2:33.0, which is slow even with the "street tire handicap" (we've run 2:28s here on A7s last year at Nationals, in TT3, with less power). Fell down to P7 on the grid.

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    I came into the garage and started checking things like shock settings, tire pressures, wiggled this and that... Spent an hour chasing a whole lot of nothing. Noticed the windshield had picked up a HUGE crack from a rock, probably when following some traffic in the wet session. "Great".

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    I went out in session 3 and found a little time, but now I'm down to P12 on grid. Everyone else is finding huge amounts of time so I'm going backwards. The car has never handled this badly, never had this wicked of a front end push. Its just killing the front tires so I don't stay out more than a few laps. Come in and change shock settings, looking for anything.

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    Went out in session 4, hot as hell, last session of the day. Still a total mess to drive, and while I got marginally quicker at a 2:32.0, I fell down the grid again further to 17th overall. What in hell is going on??? The front tires took some visible damage on the outer shoulders by the end of the day, and I've fallen from 2nd in TT2 class down to 7th out of 9. SEVENTH. My worst class finish in 2 years of driving this car.

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  3. Fair

    Fair Go Big or Go Home

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    continued from above

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    I spent an hour at the end of the day, car back up on jack stands, wheels off, checking everything I can see or torque on the suspension. All day my friend and fellow TT2 competitor Paul Costas kept telling me "string the car", meaning check the alignment. What I described to him sounded like an alignment issue, but we set this car up, so I had no reason to doubt it. I finally broke out the toe plates after we had swapped on the R7s for Sunday and promptly found the issue. Front toe was set 1/8" total toe in, instead of 1/8" toe out. So that 1/4" in toe error caused all of this hell. Wish I would have checked this earlier!! We always keep these $50 toe plates in the trailer - next time I will bring them into the garage with me! Stupid, stupid, stupid mistake.

    SUNDAY

    The weather was perfect on Sunday morning, and I was hoping we would be a LOT quicker with the alignment fix and switch to Hoosiers. Now for most of the 200TW -> Hoosier R7 testing this year the switch to R compounds was worth no more than 1 second. Problem was I was gridded way down in 17th position, which would mean I had a lot of slower cars ahead of me IF the alignment tweak fixed the handling AND the R7 Hoosiers worked at least as well as the A7s did last year in TT3.

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    I went out and immediately knew we had fixed the handling problem, and the R7s were switching on quickly. The temps were perfect but I had to fight through traffic, and passed 7 cars ahead of me in this session. That means I never got a clear lap, but I knew this 2:27.385 lap would help me grid better next time - moving me up to P10 on grid. Already 1 second faster than my previous best here at COTA - handling 100% better!

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    Of course during the out lap of Sunday TT session 1 is when the SmartyCam filled up the 4GB SD card it comes with, which will hold less than 45 minutes of video (like I said last time - you need to buy a 128 GB SD card for a SmartyCam). So we had zero video or data logging for Sunday. The damn thing doesn't beep at you or warn you - it still turns on (if it has power) and the lap timer still works, just stores zero video or data. Frustrating.... ran my quickest lap ever at COTA and I have zero video of it.

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    Even with the temps rising, TT session 2 looked to be even better, due to the big move up the grid. Now I won't have as many cars to pass, so maybe I can find more time. I still had some traffic on that first hot lap and slowed to a 2:28.248, making a pass, but seeing clearer track ahead. Kept pushing and found a 2:27.266 on hot lap 2, still getting a bit stuck, but at least quicker than session 1 and new personal best. I kept getting around cars, seeing a clear stretch of track ahead... predictive timing was now flashing low 2:25 times, which could move me as high as P3 or P4 in class, which would be great.

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    As I cross Start/Finish on hot lap 2, I see this Super Unlimited class Lamborghini Huracan with giant aero bombing down the front straight, coming up on me from way back. He put it in 2:19 lap Saturday, so I don't know why he started behind me on grid on Sunday? Some of the W2W guys like to use TT as practice, and they don't care about grid position. The above right pic shows how close he was getting to me braking up the hill into T1, after hot lap 2. I was trying to figure out how to get this guy by me without ruining my 3rd hot lap, which was showing a 2:25.0 predictive at this point...

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    I'm exiting T1, powering through 3rd and shifting into 4th gear, now in the middle of T2 at about 90 mph - when the car takes a violent, instant snap spin, like I had run though oil. Turns out I did - and unbeknownst to me, it was from my own car. Meanwhile time had slowed down for me - I was heading backwards towards the outside wall at near triple digit speeds, but at least knew enough to keep the car lined up in the direction it wanted to go, in reverse. I'm looking in the rear view mirror, trying to keep the car straight, and applying the brakes. Gently... gently... - the ABS freaks out braking hard in reverse at high speeds - steering away from the walls, got it stopped, on the apron. Whew!

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    Turn off the engine by pushing the "push to start" button, gather my wits. Hmm, I'm parked backwards looking at the exit of T2, not in a great spot if anyone else hits "whatever fluid" caused my spin. I saw a spritz of what looked like coolant on my windshield, tinted just a hair yellow - was this coolant from my car? (we don't have any coolant in this car - just distilled water and MoCool additive)

    I tentatively fire up the engine, thinking I can drive way off on the apron and get to a safe spot or maybe one of the "cut-thrus" between the track barriers, then get on the access road, pop the hood and assess the coolant leak. No idiot lights or beeping, so I start moving along slowly at about 30 mph on the wide apron off track left, then the "low oil pressure" idiot light comes on. CRAP! CRAP! CRAP! I frantically push the "push to start" button to turn off the engine and coast to stop. I stay buckled in but I'm frantically looking for fire, and wait for the flat bed. They black flagged the session early, due to my oil spill and another issue on the other side of the track that also required a flat bed.

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    After making the "tow of shame" back to the paddock, I went to the TT driver's meeting, apologized for the black flagged session. Everybody thought the worst - engine blew up, car crashed, etc. Had to calm people down, just an oil leak. First mechanical I've had in 5 years, and the first time in 33 years I've ever shut down a session. I was pissed, embarrassed, pissed some more - but I guess it was bound to happen eventually. We are meticulous about pre-track prep but must have missed something. There was hardly any oil spray in the engine bay, and we couldn't tell where the leak came from. Whatever it was we didn't have any spares to fix what broke, and the engine bay was quite drippy, so we pulled it into the trailer with the winch...

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    After we finished loading the car I still had an HPDE1 student to work with, then did some check rides. It was pretty crappy hanging around all day, hot as hell, with a non-running car in the trailer that had two more seconds left in it. Ugh.

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    At least our results moved up from 7th out of 9 on Saturday to 5th out of 9 in TT2 on Sunday, but I was not satisfied with the times from either day, for obvious reasons. This heavy street car has no business gunning for the front of TT2, with 8 out of 9 entrants running full aero and Hoosiers both days, but it still rankled me being mid-pack.

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    This frustrating weekend added the oil leak as the icing on the cake. I was trying to stay positive, but with the SmartyCam and AiM issues, the heavy rain followed by major heat and humidity, then chasing the alignment goof on Saturday that cost me any chance of getting a good time on street tires here. Just writing this report 3 months later reminded me how terrible this event went - but I'm all about sharing the good and the bad. The NASA crew did a fine job, and I'm only mad at myself. We were coming back in June with SCCA TT so I would bring street tires and try again.

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  4. Fair

    Fair Go Big or Go Home

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    continued from above

    REPAIRS AFTER COTA INCIDENT

    After unloading the car and pushing it into the shop, we got the car on the lift. There was plenty of oil evidence underneath but not much oil left in the 8 quart plastic oil pan. The oil residue led us quickly to the oil filter sandwich plate, which had cut an O-ring.

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    Why this happened took some investigation. See, this is a prototype oil cooler setup we made from parts originally built to fit the 2015-17 GT. We had to make new oil lines and route them in a new way to the front mounted heat exchanger.

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    There is a lot crap in the way down there, but the lines were too close to the Whiteline front swaybar. As the swaybar articulated it "pushed" on one of the oil lines. This rocking back-and-forth transferred to the sandwich plate and sawed through the O-ring. You can see the new oil line routing above, with a section of fire sleeve added over the portions near the sandwich plate. This helps keep them together and we added a P-clamp to one section to keep it away from the swaybar. Part of the joy of trying new things, using prototype part setups.

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    3 months later there have been no other incidents with the sandwich plate. We check this before each event, too. If its not "tight", if it can rock at all, it will get realigned and tweaked further. A new oil filter and 9 quarts of Motul 5W50 ester based oil was installed. Engine fired up, ran fine.

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    The Mustang was thoroughly washed, and pressure washed underhood and underneath. All traces of oil were removed - which was no small task.

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    The other thing that we needed to "fix" after this event were the front brake cooling hoses. These 4" high temp hoses do fine in the heat, they just get in the way of the 305 or 315mm tires we run, which like to smash them at full turning lock. Don't really see that on track but we do in the paddock and pits. We replace these two times a year, but we had a guest stopping by soon who had a new idea...

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  5. Fair

    Fair Go Big or Go Home

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    continued from above

    BRAKE COOLING METHOD + TRACK TEST

    After seeing these 4" brake duct hoses smashed to bits and getting a bit frustrated, a certain engineer (Marco) stopped by reiterating some advice he gave me 2 years ago - get rid of the dang hoses. This time we will show some work we have been doing for the past few months - a solution to cool front brakes without giant ducted hoses.

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    Long term readers here will know that we have built, tested, and perfected a number of brake cooling solutions on the S550, at least for the 15" Performance Pack brake rotors that can even be cooled (the wacky inverted hat 14" rotors cannot). Our S550 brake cooling backing plates work great for the 15" PP brakes as well as the 380mm Powerbrake kit we are running now. We make inlet ducts for the 2018-19 front end and have more in the works.

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    The inlet duct at the front of the bumper cover provides high pressure air that pushes through high temp 4" diameter corrugated hoses into the brake backing plate. This air then goes around the bearing and is pumped through the vented rotor, cooling the brake rotor/pad/etc.

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    We used this on the 15" PP1 brakes (above left) and again with our Powerbrake 380mm brakes (above right) for the past year and a half - and they worked great. Vorshlag has sold a good number of these brake cooling kits to folks with S550s and have had no complaints. We will continue to make and sell these even after we introduce this new brake cooling design.

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    They worked extremely well with the 305mm street tire setup, which is about an 11.5" wide tire. When we went to the 315mm Hoosiers, things started to get complicated. This "315" is 12.5" wide even mounted to a little 11" wide wheel (they work better on a 12" wide wheel, but then the fender poke becomes enormous)

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    Not many people run this 315mm Hoosier, as it doesn't really fit under the fenders without compromises. The obvious problem is evidenced above. Once we started running that 12.5" wide Hoosier tire up front, pushing them inboard as tight to the strut as we can get, there is no room for the brake cooling hoses. This tire is just touching the frame at full steering lock - something that is hard to avoid when you autocross the car, or hell, even driving in the paddock at a race track. Maybe we should have added steering rack limiters, but I didn't want to give up that steering angle for autocross events.

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    This meant we have had to replace the front hoses about 3 times in that period, and at a certain point in their life cycle the hoses have some holes in them and don't work as well. Again, not everyone runs a 315mm Hoosier on 18x11" wheels on the front of their S550, so most folks won't see this issue.

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    Marco suggested a new type of cooling method after we switched to the PP1 front undertray and PP2 lip: brake cooling deflectors. The added "tunnels" in the front undertray provide a path he helped engineer into the S550 for brake cooling air. I was very skeptical, as we have used brake ducting hoses pumping into the back of the rotor for decades without fail.

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    This is a trick the OEMs often do on certain models, as they obviously cannot add brake cooling hoses from the factory due to the situations that we have run into at full lock on super wide tires. This is also known as the "scoop and flap" method, which was introduced by Porsche in the 1980s and copied by other OEMs later. The S550 was the first time this was used on a Mustang, and then only on the PP1 brake equipped cars (there is no sense in trying to "cool" the inverted hat rotors on other models). Strangely enough the GT350 has the tunnels but they removed the flaps or "deflectors" on the lower control arm before the car went to production.

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    Now that we had the tunnel to feed the deflector we could test this on track. Again - I was very skeptical, but we agreed to try it. We added the "bikini" heat shield in place of our brake backing plate. This is to shield the three ball joints (at the steering tie rod and two control arm mounts) from heat radiated by the nearby rotor (which can get to over 900°F even with forced brake cooling).

    Removing the full dust shield and only using the "bikini" shield leaves the back of the hub area open for cooling. The brake cooling flap bolts to the control arm and deflects the air towards the hub and inside of the rotor. Then the vanes in the rotor pumps the air through the rotor ring and removes the heat.

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    For our first deflector iteration (version 1) we made an aluminum deflector about 40% larger in surface area than the plastic unit used on the PP1 cars. We placed it in what we thought would be the best part of the air stream from two different cold air sources (see below), thinking that the tunnels alone might not feed enough air to the brakes. We trimmed and fitted these until they cleared our 18x11" wheels, which is the smallest diameter anyone could hope to fit over the 15" PP1 brakes.

    There are cut-outs to clear the tie rod, and it bolts to one of the control arms (the forward "TC rod"). Since we have aftermarket arms there are no holes to bolt to, so Brad used some U-bolts to clamp it to the round TC arm. At full lock the deflector would get no airflow, but that is a situation you never see on track - and our hoses were crushed flat at full lock anyway.

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    We have long been told by aerodynamic engineers that the corrugated brake cooling hose has terrible airflow, with a boundary layer that stalls out near the surface of the inner corrugations. So a 4" diameter corrugated hose flows about the same as a 2" diameter smooth bore hose. Problem is, smooth bore hoses cannot bend, and the old school hoses needed to articulate with the steering.

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  6. Fair

    Fair Go Big or Go Home

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    continued from above

    I was super skeptical so we made a temporary hose from the 4" oval deflector we had on the right front. We used some smooth bore 3" diameter hose necked down from the 4" oval inlet, and at the back of the fender liner added a small 3" aluminum mandrel bend, to point air at the deflector. On the other side we kept our proven 4" brake backing plate and inlet with a brand new 4" hose.

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    Then we scheduled a private test at MSR to see any side-to-side differences in rotor temps, after bombing into the hot pits after a number of hot laps with no cool down.

    ADDING OIL PRESSURE GAUGE + RAM MOUNT

    To prevent any future mistakes where I try to start an engine that has a massive oil leak again, I ordered another one of the low cost, electronic, full sweep stepper gauges from Glowshift to monitor Oil Pressure. There is no gauge on my Mustang for this - just the idiot light.

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    Our S197 Boss302 3-gauge pod we have added on top of the S550 dash already had 3 gauges we needed: engine oil, trans oil, and diff oil temp gauges. So the new 0-150 psi oil pressure gauge and add-on, programmable WARNING LIGHT were added to the left of the pod, as shown. Not going to win any car shows with this setup, but we are looking for function over form here.

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    Brad wired this in using the wiring that came with the kit + a set of Weatherpack connectors and pins. These aren't as fancy as the Deutch connectors we use on most race car builds, but this isn't a long term race car (we have an end game in sight).

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    Brad also added a 1" ball RAM mount base to the right of the pod. I wanted this so I can mount my AiM Solo -or- a wide angle video camera here using RAM arms, which removes at least one suction cup windshield mount from the windshield. The plastic panel we attach everything to is cheap and easily replaced, so why not drill more holes?? This entire gauge cluster + dash piece will likely migrate to the next S550 chassis.

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    The pressure sensor that came with the gauge kit was inserted into the 2nd 1/8" NPT port on the Mishimoto sandwich plate. These come with plugs but we are using both of them now with sensors for oil temp and oil pressure. This sandwich plate has a thermostatic bypass for the oil cooler as well. Brad wired in the gauges to the light circuit, so that they can work at night as well.

    TRACK TEST, MSR-C 1.7 CCW, MAY 15, 2019

    After we made our first version of the brake cooling deflector I wanted to do two track tests to verify the effectiveness. Remember - we had the traditional 4" backing plate + corrugated hose + 4" oval inlet on the LEFT FRONT wheel, and the new brake cooling "deflector" setup on the RIGHT FRONT wheel. The RF also had the smooth bore 3" hose from the 4" inlet as well as the "tunnel" from the PP1 undertray. Double airflow to the deflector, for test one.

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    We loaded up the car and I drove out to MSR Cresson on a Thursday "member day", where I drove in 2 sessions before lunch. I arrived by 7:45 am and the weather was nearly perfect.

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    The front tires had taken a real beating at COTA with all of that crazy toe in, so the shoulders looked pretty rough. Yet I matched my previous best street tire times here on this well worn set of tires - while doing the various brake cooling tests.

    I always drive with a lot of left foot braking, shooting for threshold stops in TT wherever I can pull it off, and in these two tests session I was in full qualifying mode, pushing 10/10ths. Lots of rear tire slip, purposefully over-driving the car, trying to make the brakes as hot as I could. With the oil cooler we can make longer full-tilt sessions like this without issues (of course the diff temps were spiking after 5-6 laps again - more on that later).

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    Once again I was testing the SmartyCam wired into the AiM SOLO DL which was pulling data from the CAN system. But I don't trust it - I was so paranoid after the issues at COTA that I utilized a backup AiM Solo and a backup video camera (Sony HD on the windshield). I was not going to lose this video or data - the whole point of being here on this day was to test the brake cooling.

    I went out in the first test and did 5 laps with the brake cooling inlet OPEN on the RF, so it was getting cooling air from both the 4" oval and the tunnel to the deflector. The LF corner was open for both test and used the normal 4" corrugated hose and backing plate.

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    I drove five hot laps (with some mediocre 1:23-1:25 times in traffic) and came in to check temps... the ducted LF was 800°F and the RF was 700°F. Wait... WHAT? It was 100°F cooler on the deflector side than the ducted hose side. The car was really loose and the times were not great, but the brake temp thing had me scratching my head. I went to get fuel and covered up the inlet duct on the RF, so make the deflector only get air from the undertray tunnel. Surely this would make it lose some effectiveness. Put in fuel for 3/4 tank to try to put in some faster laps in the 2nd session. The rotors had cooled to about 230°F on both fronts (took video of that) after sitting for 10 minutes, waiting for the next session to start. So this time I was gong out on warm brakes, not ambient temp brakes like session 1.

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    This in-car video shows session 2 with 6 hot laps, where I was trying to push hard to get heat into the brakes. I nearly matched the best times ever on street tires for this car here with a 1:21.0 lap, even fuel starving in one section of left turns. I came into the pits after the 6th full hot lap, with no cool down lap, jumped out of the car, then took IR gun temps of the brake rotors. Best I can do without an expensive real time IR sensor rig on each corner.

    The Left Front, which had our traditional 4" ducted brake cooling was 880°F. The right front, with the tunnel+3" hose feeding the Vorshlag S550 brake deflector was 780°F, once again 100°F cooler. I show the rear brake temps too, just to see what they were (they also get hot).

    The SmartyCam video still has the factory default settings for the data overlay, and I've reset and checked and triple checked the programming of the SD card for the camera so many times I am losing faith. I probably need someone that knows the AiM software better to show me what I'm doing wrong - the software is just so terrible that I cannot make it work without some assistance. This is ridiculous, and we are WASTING data by using this "easier" SmartyCam slaved system. Once you tie the camera to the SOLO the data is gone.

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  7. Fair

    Fair Go Big or Go Home

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    continued from above

    More importantly - the scoop-and-flap brake cooling that Marco suggested worked better than our ducted cooling. No hoses to crush and replace, just too easy to install. And even with the cooling duct blocked off on the deflector side, it was still 100°F cooler. All of the airflow was from the tunnel in the PP1 undertray.

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    My skepticism about this brake cooling method was finally fading away, after seeing these two back to back tests first hand, but now I suspect other people won't believe me. That's fine, we will sell the ducted backing plate design. We continued to refine and test this new "scoop and flap" method for several more track events before sharing our findings here. We have revised and improved the deflector design two more times. We should have S550 options available shortly after this post is published.

    REAR SHOCK OFFSET LOWER T-BAR

    The stock rear suspension on the S550 uses a "divorced" spring and shock, with the spring located inboard on the control arm connected to a pocket on the chassis. Big diameter, necessary to make enough spring rate on this "poor motion ratio" location. It is done for packaging reasons, platform sharing, etc. It is really to have a "coilover shock" spring mounting location on the rear suspension of most cars.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    For an S550 we like to move the spring outboard and mount it onto the shock, which allows us a lot of advantages: A) this way we can have ride height adjustability without a lot of extra hardware, B) we can use a variety of spring rates and lengths using 2.25" inner diameter coilover springs, and C) the springs are much lighter than the larger but super soft OEM bits. And, we don't suffer the usual compromises we see on other cars, like the S197 that loses tire room when converted to coilover.

    [​IMG]

    The key take-away is that we need MORE SPRING RATE to turn these marshmallow Mustang suspensions into something that can avoid the brake dive, body roll, and heave. Real spring rates require "real" dampers... adjustable monotubes are the best solution there. This is where we come in.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Our very first coilover install for the S550 (March of 2015, above left) utilized an Eibach lowering spring in the stock divorced spring position. It was a while before MCS moved to a coilover rear, but in the meantime we ran the Whiteline/AST coilovers (above right) starting in early 2018. These utilized an inverted shock design with the spring at the bottom of the shock. This moved the spring very close to the rear axle's CV boot.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Then in September 2018 we tested the Ohlins R&T coilovers for a few months, which uses a coilover style spring but mounted in the stock divorced spring location. Unlike the Eibach lowering spring it was easier to find stiffer rates for this setup. This removes the spring from being close to the axle/CV boot.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    The mounting in the actual control arm could be a challenge, as Ford changed the lower control arm casting from 2015 to sometime around 2018, as shown above.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    I had to cut the top of the "protrusion" off of our 2018 arms, then do a bit of grinding to make the Ohlins 2.5" ID spring adapter fit.We show all of this in our S550 Ohlins coilover instruction gallery.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    We moved to the MCS RR2 remote reservoir dampers and even more aggressive spring rates after the Ohlins R&T testing, but had some issues with shock lengths. Working with MCS on shock lengths (2" shorter bodies) as well as our new spherical upper shock mount with dual mounting heights (1.5" more stroke) gained us the bump travel we needed at a lowered ride height, and more.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    That bump travel testing/shock mount design work consumed a lot of our bandwidth, but meanwhile Brad noticed some axle grease on one of the springs...

    [​IMG]

    Packaging gets very tight back there when you run a coilover shock setup, with the spring getting precariously close to the CV boot on the rear axles. To gain the most room any coilover rear shock setup on the S550 needs to be inverted, with the spring down lower (below the barrel of the wheel) to clear a BIG wheel and tire package, like the 18x11" and 19x11" we like to run. Of course to be run inverted, a shock has to be a monotube - a twin tube damper cannot be run upside down like this.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    As we have seen, every additional 1/8" of room we can get between the CV boot and the spring is crucial. Even though the 2.25" ID coilover spring was spaced away from the CV boot, after higher speed events like COTA - where we reach 150 mph on the back straight - we noticed that the CV boot "grows" enough to tough the spring. It gets a tiny crack then spits out the grease. Oh well, we bought a $52 CV boot kit from Ford.

    continued below
     
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  8. Fair

    Fair Go Big or Go Home

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    continued from above

    Turns out this CV boot from Ford is so hard that it won't slip over the CV housing. Hours were wasted, heat guns and special tools and all sorts of tricks were tried.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    We called a tech at a Ford dealer, familiar with the S550, and he said "Oh those never work - just buy a new axle!)"

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    It sounds crazy, but this is not a serviceable CV boot. And to remove the axle is not a fun job. In any case, this is an issue we chased for weeks.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    We have changed both rear axles once and the need to be done again, as the CV boosts are cracked again. We have investigated and found that the Whiteline shocks used an offset lower T-bar mount (as well as a smaller diameter 50mm ID spring), which MCS now has as well.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Whiteline's unit as above left, MCS at right. Just know that if you bought some S550 MCS coilovers before mid 2019, you need to convert to the new offset T-bar - which kicks the bottom of the shock away from the spring. Its an easy change to make, and MCS has these for both the GT350/PP2 spacing and normal S550 mounting hole spacing. They have even slotted the holes to allow for additional shock offset adjustment.

    [​IMG]

    I hope someday that a more pliable CV boot comes out for the S550, because I have a number of used axles with just a little crack in the boots. [​IMG] And while this was a lot of writing and pictures to show what few of you might care about, we learned this the hard way (4 axle replacements!) and wanted to share this tech bit. THE CV BOOT GROWS!

    SCCA TIME TRIAL, COTA, JUNE 29, 2019

    I signed up for just one day of this 2 day SCCA Time Trial weekend at COTA, partly due to costs but more because I was super busy and couldn't afford a 2 day weekend + a Friday travel day away from the shop. The Texas Region SCCA TT group had never run an event here, and were only able to pull this together because the Club Racer attendance was low and they needed "numbers". I had a feeling this event might be our last chance to run this track in the red 2018 GT (I was right) and I wanted vindication for the problematic event we had in May with COTA. Just wanted to finally see a sub 2:30 lap time on street tires. Again, we've run 2:27s here on R7s, just not a strong time on streets.

    Amy and I left Friday early afternoon, once again took us 5 hours to get there again (traffic on I-35 is horrible - this drive is always a beating), arriving at 7 pm. We quickly unhooked the trailer, went and had a good dinner with many of the SCCA TT folks at Javi's Tex Mex, then hit the hotel. Got to see folks we don't get to hang out with often, which was nice. That's when we saw the scheduled - which only showed 2 sessions per day for TT. While I was worried beforehand the SCCA Club Racers would get preferential treatment with respect to track time, and of course they did in a BIG way. It was also very, very hot (99F). They also told us that the track limits were super strict, which would change our lines drastically from any other group that runs here. All of the big curbs were in place.

    SATURDAY

    There was a ridiculously early 6:30 am TT drivers meeting, then first car out was to be 8 am, with TT being the first group to take the track for the day. Really long meeting, and of the 33 cars entered, 3/4 of the people raised their hand when asked "who has never run at COTA". Yikes... this did not bode well. My heart just sunk.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Luckily they started me in P1 on the grid, knowing that I had run here 7 times before and could lead the group out, bunch them up well, before we would go green at T19 on the out lap. Kinda late to go green for what I'm used to, but it's their party, their rules. There is also limited passing with this group (only on straights with point-bys) so that could prove to be an issue. But leading the group out for this 3.41 mile circuit with only 33 cars, I should easily get 3-4 laps traffic free.

    The morning TT session was the only time we would get a cool track surface, according to the forecast. The next session wasn't until after 2 pm, when it would be well into the 90's and with the sun beating down making the track surface "boiling". Again, these RE-71R tires have about 2 hard laps in them at COTA in the Texas Summer, so the first two laps in this first session were all that would matter.

    I got to grid at 7:45 am, and they kept giving us repeated "5 minute" warnings with 33 engines running... waiting. Finally I took the initiative, turned off the engine, and peeling out of the car - as I was sweating profusely in my 3 layer suit in the car (I should have just turned the damned air con on.) The rest of the drivers followed suit and we all huddled in the limited shade near grid.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    We finally got the go ahead, hopped in our cars, and went out on track at 8:26 am, with the sun beating down. Ambient temps showed to be 76°F when we headed out but the humidity was near 100%, so it was "unpleasant". Again, due to a forecast of high 90s later in the day and not having another session for SIX HOURS, this first session was the only one that would matter for good lap times.

    [​IMG]

    I stacked up the the group while we made a brisk 50-60 mph average out lap, as instructed. It takes a while to get all of these cars out of grid but I had everyone bunched up nicely...

    [​IMG]

    Except for one goofball - who had left grid to "go get gas", wondered back over after we had left, and didn't go out on track for 5+ minutes after we left. Why grid let him out on track so late is a question I asked the grid workers later, with an elevated emphasis... And why he drove SO SLOWLY on his very late to start out lap, I also asked directly, with elevated emphasis...

    [​IMG]

    Finally got the out lap done, and at T19 I turned on the speed, setting up for a fast hot Lap 1. Huge gap opened up behind me, which was fine. But as you can see in the video above, by T6 I had caught the "late to leave grid" goofball, who was on a leisurely 40mph pace lap without a care in the world. And of course he wasn't paying any attention to his mirrors, and didn't see me until I was already having to shut down my lap and riding his bumper. Of course I am fuming about losing this first hot lap for no good reason. I finally got around him at T9, but I had lost so much time that I had to back off and "reset", manage tire temps and the gap behind, and get ready for Hot Lap 2. There were waving black flags for some reason on the back straight anyway, but nothing came of that.

    The same guy proceeded on his 40 mph pace for "his" whole out lap, which was smack dab in the middle of everyone else's hot lap 1 - making the entire field behind me pass him, one at a time. Complete and total newbie move. So lap 1 all got to be the "train" passing the moving apex, that you always try to avoid in Time Trial. Everyone was super pissed at this guy, who just simply could not get his brain in gear (he ended up with a 2:55 best lap time of the weekend - about 15 seconds slower than Spec Miata).

    continued below
     
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  9. Fair

    Fair Go Big or Go Home

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    continued from above

    So on this aborted first Hot lap I reset, left a huge gap behind, and drove tamely until T19, then went green again looking for a good Hot Lap 2. I come around T20, good blast down the front straight, then I start seeing black flags and then waving yellows from T4 on. Turns out another competitor had spun coming out of the slowest turn of the track (T12) on the first hot lap. Backed it into a wall. Top speed through this turn is literally 45 mph, folks. (facepalm) Since he didn't have tow hooks installed (they were in his trunk!) the track crew had to spend half an hour extracting him from the wall and towing him back on a roll back truck, so the session was shut down midway through the second lap. And that was that. My only chance of the day to get a clear track with favorable conditions was up in smoke. Bonus: the timers never even worked, so nobody got any times whatsoever.

    [​IMG]

    After hanging around for SIX HOURS I finally went out again in the 2nd TT session at 2:30 pm, but by then it was 92°F degrees outside and the track surface was boiling. And for for some reason they had shuffled the grid, and dropped me down to P2, even though there were no times were in the first TT session. I had some quick guys all around me, but they weren't the typical "my fastest lap is on lap 1" hard core TT folks, you know? I feared early traffic, and my fears were well founded.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    On the out lap I built a 200 yard gap ahead to the Corvette (Relle, super nice guy, and pretty quick), then I went green at T19, but he he waited until T20 to go, and I got uncomfortably close to him right before the Start/Finish on the first lap. Luckily he has a lot more power and pulled out a bit on the front straight (C6 Z06), but then I caught him in the esses on lap 1 (below).

    [​IMG]

    I had to back off then for a bit, but since we both had a few fast cars behind us, I kept pushing his mirrors. That forced a mistake, he drove wide out of T11 and pointed me by, but by then I had lost all momentum in that turn (was 8 mph down in the braking zone into T12) and that lap was a throw away (2:34.4).

    [​IMG]

    By the very next lap now I had my mirrors full of cars, including the C6Z that had let me by (above). I drove raggedly putting in an even slower 2:35.3 lap, which was all my fault. As we started lap 3, just after the S/F line, I backed off and pointed Relle (C6Z) back by, then Dusty (fast 2nd GEN Camaro), and tried to take a cool down lap and build a gap. I also let Scottish Joe (C7GS) Cody (6th gen 1LE) go by on the back straight.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Finally on hot lap 5 I had a decent gap ahead and behind, but all of the fluid temps were climbing, and these tires were still boiling. I gave it a shot anyway and put in a lousy 2:32.842 best lap - nearly a second down on my times here in May (with the massive push / alignment snafu). The track surface temp was just too hot at 130°F.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    After this session I was completely spent from the heat, and we had to hydrate up before we could load up the trailer. It was 99°F when we left at 3:30 pm, but we had no interest in sticking around for several hours more for "maybe" a third TT session (they got one at 5:30 pm, but the track surface was so hot nobody in TT went faster). Glad we didn't sign up or stick around for Sunday, either, as they had a soaking wet downpour in session 1 and then it got hot again for their next session 6 hours later.
    [​IMG]

    We sponsored beers for the TT "after party" Saturday night, but it wasn't until 6:30 pm and we were most of the way home by then. The results for Saturday are above, but overall I was more upset that I couldn't manage a decent first sessison lap than my "3rd place" in their autocross based classing.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Looking back on it, this probably wasn't the best event to try to get lap time test data from. We did test both the new diff cooler and brake cooling flaps. The brakes worked great, but with the narrow range 0-250°F Diff Temp gauge (the one on the far right above), it was still getting pegged in the later laps of the second hot session. We have to put a wider range gauge (0-300F) there, then test it again without the pump on + with the pump/cooler on + with the pump & fan turned on (I will show that stuff next time).

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    I will think twice before entering another SCCA TT event when they are sharing the weekend with the SCCA Club Race group (all of whom got 5 sessions on track per day). Both times we have done that the TT group ended up with very truncated session and/or many fewer sessions than normal. Not the best deal for the TT entrants. Normally this group puts on great events when they don't try to "cross the streams" with Club Racers at the same time.

    continued below
     
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  10. Fair

    Fair Go Big or Go Home

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    continued from aobve

    NEXT BUILD: 2015 MUSTANG GT "RACE CAR"

    Are you tired of hearing me make excuses about driving a 3800 pound street car against other race cars in NASA TT? Well I sure the hell am. Can't cut the car, can't flare the car, no more power potential in the Coyote, yadd-yadd-yadda. So instead of just complaining for another season, we are doing something about it...

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    After some internal debate about our "next big build" it was decided that a lightweight, caged, aero equipped, flared and basically "full re**rd" S550 makes more sense to develop. Rather than ruining a clean "full bolt on" 2018 GT, that still has a lot of value as a street car, we can get more serious about pushing this a dedicated chassis. So I put a call out a couple of months ago for a 2015-up S550 Mustang rolling chassis, and after looking locally and trolling salvage auctions for months, it was a bust.

    [​IMG]

    Then Steve Poe of Poe Motorsports put me in touch with The Parts Farm in Lyons, Georgia. These guys buy wrecked V8 pony cars to salvage the drivetrains and other parts. I told them what I needed and they sent me a dozens of pics of the 2015 Mustang GT above, they had already stripped of the 5.0L engine/trans/wiring and a few other parts. This car was otherwise very rebuildable for a race car. The $2500 price was the best deal I had seen in months of looking at even less suitable candidates (some people wanted $10-15K for a wrecked V6 Mustang!)

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    A long time friend of mine, Paul M, volunteered to co-drive with me for the 2000 mile round trip from Dallas to east Georgia and back. We left int he F350 and enclosed trailer at 5:30 am one Friday morning, drove all night and arrived at the farm-turned-salvage yard at 9:45 am Saturday morning. The folks there were super helpful and already had the car ready to load. We pushed it near the trailer ramp, winched it inside, paid for the car, and we were back on the road 45 minutes later. It was a grueling 34 hour round trip, but we had full day Sunday to catch up.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Yes, this is a wrecked car, but it's a $2500 complete chassis that is 100% paid for (and I've already sold $1100 worth of parts off this that we won't need). The main frame rails and upper horns are straight, the doors close perfectly, and it has zero rust or other issues. We got an initial weight at 2349 pounds (no engine/trans/front brakes) and already removed a lot of fluff (its under 2100 now) with more to go.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    The bank owns most of my 3626 pound 2018 GT, and doing competition track events in a car you are making payments on is less than optimum - that's what we tell our clients. I'm just going to finally follow our own advice. Our crew already has this '15 new 1537 pounds lighter than the 2018 GT, missing the drivetrain and some other bits. At 2089 pounds there is still carpet, a full dash, center console and both 84.2 pound doors in place! We think a sub 3000 pound caged S550 race car is possible...

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    We have a lot of plans for this one, and of course many of the parts from the suspension, brakes, wheels, seats, and bodywork from the 2018 GT will be moved over to this chassis. What will power it? Well I need to think on this one?? I will show all of the progress of this 2015 GT in this same thread, next time. #LS550

    WHAT'S NEXT?

    I skipped an event we did in the 2018 GT in here, since this post was running long. Optima @ NCM in early June, which is 3 days of stuff I will cover next time. So much went on that weekend that it needs a new post to cover it. I will also cover the development and install of the diff cooler we installed before the SCCA @ COTA TT event.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Next time we will show the "Ricco Swappe" parts migration from the 2018 GT to the 2015 GT chassis, and I'll even link to the 2010 Mustang GT Gen2 Coyote swap we are doing (we aren't TOTAL monsters). We will also cover the last events in the 2018 GT we haven't yet - another SCCA TT event at MSR 1.3 in August and an August NASA "TT event" at TMS (which went all sorts of sideways). August track events in Texas are VERY hot, by the way.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    That's enough for this time, hope it wasn't a boring read!

    Cheers,
     
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  11. VoodooBoss

    VoodooBoss Rick Moderator

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    Looking forward to seeing what you do with your new race car build.
     

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