Vorshlag 2018 Mustang GT + S550 Development Thread

Discussion in 'Vorshlag Motorsports' started by Fair, Mar 9, 2018.

  1. Fair

    Fair Go Big or Go Home

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    continued from above

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    The front bumper cover has to come off, as do the coolant lines and main radiator hose shown above. Then an oil filter sandwich plate goes in place of the little cooling brick shown before.

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    This oil filter sandwich plate is a very well made part and has a thermostatic bypass, so cold oil doesn't pass through the Mishimoto heat exchanger. It also has two 1/8" NPT plugs - one of which we installed with an oil temp sensor (more on that later). The "Active grill shutter" system is in the way of where the heat exchanger goes, so it was removed.

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    The sandwich plate plate is installed at the oil filter location (after removing the Ford brick) and the included -10 AN braided lines go from there to the external cooler. The oil filter then goes back below the plate, in the same spot as the OEM.

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    The heat exchanger is nicely sized and fits right behind the factory upper grill opening, with a well made bracket that attaches to the carbon composite radiator support structure above. The lines connect to the single pass cooler at opposite ends, as shown.

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    The install is pretty straight forward, other than clocking the sandwich plate and routing the lines. It gets a little tight around the giant Whiteline swaybar, but there's a 1/2" of room to the hose ends. We only added a little bracket with a Vibrant dual hose separator attached to keep the braided lines from sawing into any nearby plastics, but that might be overkill.

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    Brad and Evan wrapped up the oil cooler install and we moved on to the new temp gauges...

    OIL TEMP / TRANS TEMP / DIFF TEMP GAUGES

    Rumor has it that the factory "oil temp" gauge readings are fake - they are inferred numbers based on other inputs and readings. I also wanted "real gauges" that I could see without having to scroll through menus while on track. Ideally these could be data logged, but with a rear mounted camera (and me calling out temps while driving to the mic) I could capture this data with discrete, analog type gauges.

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    I purchased these three 2-1/6" "GlowShift" gauges above, which are ranged and marked for engine Oil temp (100-300F), Trans fluid temp (80-260F) and Diff fluid temp (100-250F) uses. Electric steeper gauges, work pretty well. These are all three trouble spots on the S550 chassis, especially trans and diff (and for 2018-19, oil temp). It would have been better to install real gauges for engine oil temp sooner, but our testing and work schedule doesn't always allow for this. Instead we planned to install oil temp, diff temp, and trans temp gauges during the Mishimoto oil cooler install (since the sandwich plate had the oil temp sensor port).

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    We popped the front dash cover off then the center top panel of the dash was removed. We plan to mount a 2012-13 Boss 302 Ford Racing triple gauge pod to this panel, which can be replaced if we ever want to un-do all of these mods.

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    There were many aftermarket gauge pods to choose from out there but none of them looks half as good as this Ford Racing unit, made for mounting three 2-1/16" gauges.

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    Once the gauge pod was mounted to the upper dash panel the GlowShift electric stepper motor 270 sweep gauges were installed and wired in. I'm not going to bore you with the steps for wiring but it takes a number of hours to do this correctly - where it is tired into the light circuit, with fuses, and soldering and heat shrinking everything. Brad also added weatherpack connectors near each sensor, so that things like the trans and diff could be removed by just unplugging the sensor circuit.

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  2. Fair

    Fair Go Big or Go Home

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    continued from above

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    The MT82-D4 six speed manual trans was easy tap get a sensor into. We researched, ordered, then replaced the M16 threaded lower drain plug on the bottom with this special adapter we found, which has a 1/8" NPT female opening in the middle. This meant we needed to do a trans fluid change, the 2nd in 1800 miles of use, but its never a bad idea.

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    The diff sensor install was a bit last minute, and I did this one myself. I had ordered what I thought was the right adapter, in stainless steel, with overnight shipping. But what showed up five days later (!?) was wrong. Some evening searching in the Home Depot plumbing aisle got me what I needed: a 1/2" MIP to 1/8" FIP adapter. This replaced the stock 1/6" NPT lower drain plug.

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    One thing I noted when adding this sensor: when I drained out the diff (which we had changed early on to MOTUL synthetics) it was about 1/3rd of the fluid missing... gone. It has been boiling off due to high temps, we suspect. And there was a LOT of material on the magnetic drain plug. This was likely material from the clutch packs on this base model car's clutch style differential (its worn smooth out). The Performance Pack and Shelby cars all get a Torsen.

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    These gauges really do work great, especially considering they are under $70 each. The install was a total pain but in the long run it should be worth it. I am making sure I take a picture of the gauges right after I come in (it takes several minutes for them to cool down from their peak numbers) from each session, hopefully getting the AiM Solo readout to know which session (lap times) they correspond to. Again, once I get the rear mounted vidcam in place this shouldn't be necessary. Already seen some great data from these 3 gauges.

    MSR-C TRACK TEST, NOVEMBER 24th, 2018

    This was a member day at MSR Cresson where they were running the 1.7 CCW and a bunch of buddies were going. I had finished the gauge install the night before and was going to load up onto a trailer in the morning. Due to some things out of control, my enclosed trailer and the open trailer I normally use as back-up were both out of commission.

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    I borrowed a trailer the night before, picking it up late and in the dark. In the light of morning we noticed it was about 4" too narrow to clear the track width of this car - it would be inside the trailer fenders. So we went to a nearby trailer rental place and rented their so-called "car hauler", which took a lot of ramps and wood to get the car up onto the deck (of this tractor/utility trailer). The fenders were so tall I had to crawl out the open window. Good thing we didn't buy a Camaro - that would be impossible!

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    We made it to MSR rather later than we had planned, but the weather was overcast and cool so the "early session" wasn't the only fast session. The weather was so nice in fact that the track was rather crowded with members, and that turned into a challenge for getting clan laps.

    Picture and video gallery: https://vorshlag.smugmug.com/Racing-Events/MSR-Test-112418/

    My testing goals for this day were 3 fold: 1) Test out the new Ohlins R&T coilovers at MSR-C on their 1.7 mile CCW course. 2) Test both the Hoosier A7 and RE-71R street tires, back-to-back. 3) Get some data with oil/trans/diff temps with the newly added Mishimoto oil cooler.

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    Both sets of tires were pretty "tired" but the data was still valuable, and it would be back-to-back on the same day. I haven't done a street tire vs R-compound tire test like this in a LONG time. The first session would be on the RE-71R 200TW tires, which had 8 weekends of abuse on them now.

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    Remember, one of the Hoosier A7 tires was already showing a stripe of cord on the outside edge, so this is far from a perfect test. I moved that wheel to the left front, which is the less stressed front tire on this track. Hoping I get a clear lap in the first or second hot lap, so that the tires don't overheat and "fall off".

    That's not how it worked out, of course. There were some rolling trains of cars, plus I got stuck behind a few slow pokes, but that's what happens on a nice member Saturday in late November.

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    I had several buddies out there, including Brian in his GT350, Jerry's last drive in his C6 Z06 (he just got a C7 Z06), and Kevin had his new C7 ZR1 on Michelin slicks.

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    As you will see in the video below, some knucklehead pulled right out of the pit lane onto the track, right in front of me on my first flying hot lap. That was the best shot at a good lap time on these tires. Gone. I also got blocked again on laps 2, 3, 5 and 6 (two of those shown above), and had a hair raising 3 wide pass on Lap 3 (the 86 driver talked to me after - he knew I was passing but the NSX pulled over on him!) I had to stick with hot lap 4, my only lap clear of traffic. Lap 4 on an A7 is usually not at all what you look for...

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    Lap times on Hoosier A7s (not showing the out lap or cool down laps)
    Lap 1: 1:24.921 (traffic)
    Lap 2: 1:29.021 (traffic)
    Lap 3: 1:22.441 (traffic)
    Lap 4: 1:21.138
    Lap 5: 1:21.507 (traffic)
    Lap 6: 1:22.308 (traffic)

    The AiM Solo was showing predictive times as quick as a 1:20.5, but all I ended up with only a 1:21.138. That's still a solid 8 tenths faster than this car has ever run here on RE-71R tires, and fully 3 laps past when these tires have their best performance (lap 1).

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    After 8 total laps in this session, both front tires were now showing cords. The worst one was showing cords on the inside and outside shoulders. This tire had been flipped inside out between the COTA and NOLA weekends - the majority of the wear is from the outside shoulder, even with -4° of front camber. The tread layer was actually peeling smooth off on the outer two inches, so these tires were officially D-U-N!

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    The temps on the fluids looks within spec (pic above shot right as I came into paddock), but only just in spec for the trans and diff. We have some ideas on how to combat high diff temps that we will address very soon. Engine oil looks perfect, and I rattle off all of the temps at the end of the Hoosier test video.

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  3. Fair

    Fair Go Big or Go Home

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    continued from above

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    Not having our enclosed trailer meant I had to throw a bunch of tools and such in the back of the pickup. Brought a new battery jump box / air compressor to set pressures (#500psi) and a crappy jack that will never go to the track with us again. Pulled the four wheels and tires off and took them to Doghouse Performance for a tire swap to the RE-71R streets. That took about an hour while we sat out a session and let everything cool down.

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    Made it back out in the last session of the day, 4:30 pm, but luckily the temps were still cool and the partial clouds were keeping the track from cooking on this 70°F day. It was less crowded out there, but this set of tires had been sitting in the shop for a couple of months and took a couple of laps to scrub them back in and get the tires up to temp.

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    I edited the video down a good bit, but in this session I got stuck behind some slow Miatas, a new NSX, and two Porsches. Somehow I managed 3 laps in a row without traffic.

    Lap times on RE-71Rs (not showing the out lap or cool down laps)
    Lap 1: 1:28.748 (cold tires + caught a slow Miata)
    Lap 2: 1:23.065 (still cold tires)
    Lap 3: 1:22.126 (nearly matched the best lap these tires have ever done - when new)
    Lap 4: 1:22.440 (made a big mistake in big bend - almost had a 1:21.1)
    Lap 5: 1:26.188 (passed a new NSX + caught slow Porsche)
    Lap 6: 1:24.050 (lapped slow Miata + caught slow Porsche)

    On lap 3 everything mostly worked, and got that 1:22.126. That is less than 2 tenths off my best lap ever on these tires, 8 months earlier. So the stories of RE-71Rs wearing out or falling off might be greatly exaggerated. We used these RE-71Rs at yet another event after this!

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    The difference in grip from A7s to RE-71Rs was painfully apparent, and there is one full second difference in lap times (see log of best laps for each tire, above) but I fear that the lap time differences don't show a fair representation of that.

    With the laps on the A7s I was considerably restricted by traffic. There was some "potential improvement" I didn't reach on the street tires, too. On my best RE-71R lap the AiM showed a 1:21.5 predicted time, and on Lap 4 it showed a 1:21.1 pred, but I screwed up something on both laps. Either time would have a marked improvement over the 1:21.9 previous best lap on these same tires. Oh well, I'm a bit of a hack driver and can't always match what the computer says is possible (that 1:21.9 lap was matching predicative, so it was a better driven lap).

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    The small changes made since that March NASA TT event - mostly brakes - are what makes the difference. The Whiteline and Ohlins coilovers are using about the same spring rates (which both produce more roll than I like on Hoosiers - see the 3 phases of Big Bend, above), but some of that potential lap time improvement from March to December would be firmer spring rates & damping of the Ohlins setup. I still need to get a lap on the RE-71Rs here on the MCS RR2s...

    PRODUCTION TOW HOOKS RELEASED

    We didn't do much to the Mustang over the next week, other than getting the prototype front and rear S550 tow hooks ready for production. These were made back in the summer but the templates were lost in the move. Off comes the front and rear bumper covers.

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    Once the prototype pieces we made were removed they were reverse-engineered and a few updates were made. These changes make the cut parts 1-piece, to remove some welding, but we did add a cut line for the bend.

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    Getting these into CAD then cutting them on our CNC plasma table a few minutes later was nice. I love this machine and we keep coming up with new products to make on it. Getting the settings right for each material isn't easy, but we're working our way through steel, aluminum, and stainless in various thicknesses and finding out what works.

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    We now have a production batch of red powder coated steel tow hooks that bolt on without cutting any painted parts or removing critical crash structures of your S550 chassis.

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    The S550 rear tow hook kit is a 100% no cut/bolt-on part. The front (2018-19 GT) kit requires a notch be cut into the lower black grill plastics. We include a cutting template for the front 2018-19 GT tow hook kit and will be making these for the 2015-17 cars and Shelby GT350 models soon. We include a cutting template to cut a 4" oval hole and 3 mounting holes, then the inlet ducts bolt in and mount on the back side of this plastic grill. Some 4" hose connects the inlet to the backing plates, and now you have brake cooling. We are already working on some other S550 Mustang model variants and will show that next time.

    PRODUCTION S550 BRAKE BACKING PLATES

    While we had the car apart we went ahead and made a major revision and production batch of S550 front brake cooling backing plates and 2018-19 GT brake cooling inlet ducts.

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    On the backing plate we changed from the prototype's round 4" opening to this 4" oval, as this shape puts all of the airflow "inside" the rotor ring. Pumping cool air in this region first cools the front wheel hub, then the air is pumped through the vented rotor ring.

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    This "ghosted" picture shows the backing plate's 4" oval opening being under the rotor ring of the 2015-19 Performance Pack 15" rotors. This backing plate works on the 6 piston Brembo PP brakes as well as the 380mm 6 piston Powerbrake front kit (PB caliper shown).

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    This backing plate also serves as a heat shield, protecting three different ball joints (see above right) on the front suspension from the heat radiated by the brake rotors. This is why we use 304 Stainless Steel vs Aluminum or Carbon steel - SS has better thermal resistance, and is often used for heat shields.

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  4. Fair

    Fair Go Big or Go Home

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    continued from above

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    To get air to the rotor backing plates it needs to come from somewhere. On the 2018-19 GT there isn't a great place to steal air from, so we took some dead flat space in the corners of these lower grill pockets, that were likely added for styling.

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    SCCA CLUB TRIALS, MSR 1.3, DECEMBER 1, 2018

    This was our last opportunity to compete on track for 2018. The Hoosiers were TOAST but the RE-71Rs had a little tread left. Send it! The weather for the Saturday event was forecast to be excellent, so right after wrapping up the new brake backing plates and production tow hooks on the Mustang I washed then we loaded up the Mustang the night before. Of course it rained overnight, and being on an open trailer, the freshly washed Mustang had spots on it all damn day at the track (see below).

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    I'd rather have a dirty car running on a dry day, of course. You can see the shape of the Mishimoto oil cooler almost perfectly fits inside the reduced opening of the upper grill in that close up pic. The back-up open trailer was back so we loaded up after I washed the car Friday for the event on Saturday.

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    We were back at MSR but running on the smaller, more technical 1.3 mile course, which has a lot of elevation change. This course is located next to the MSR 1.7 course, which an HPDE group was running that same day. The SCCA used the newly built MSR "Museum" clubhouse for the driver's meeting, and that's where most of us spent time between sessions. After seeing the insulating foam in here, I sure was glad we painted the foam insulation in our shop (otherwise it turns this yellow color in a short time).

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    At this point the 9 month old RE-71Rs weren't going to shine, but I wanted to get more temp data on the oil/trans/diff fluids as well as the Mishimoto oil cooler. Also wanted to see how the Ohlins R&T coilovers stacked up against the tough "CAM-C" class Mustangs and Camaros that run a lot of TT events in this region. I'd be learning a new track so it would be dependent on "that driving stuff" more than normal.

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    For the past 5 years the Texas Region SCCA has been holding TT events (9 events in 2018) using modified autocross classes, unlike the SCCA National TT classes. While it is far from perfect, it is a lot more sensible than 2018 National TT classing, which I'm not a huge fan of. It also makes it easy for local autocrossers to "class" their cars.

    The cars we would be running against in the combined "CAM" classes are all on 200 TW tires and include 5th and 6th gen Camaros (including many 1LEs and even a new ZL1 1LE), S197 and S550 Mustangs, and a healthy chunk of C6 and C7 Corvette Grand Sports and Z06s, including some heavily modded ones. They have a "handicap" system that merges the Pony Car Mustangs/Camaros in the same class as Corvettes. This doesn't work that well, but "it is what it is" and most of the competitors ignore the "handicap" times and just look at the raw times. This Region has some TT classing changes for 2019 that might work better. We would be looking more closely at the CAM-C pony cars.

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    Event Photo Gallery: https://vorshlag.smugmug.com/Racing-Events/SCCA-CT-MSR-120118/

    The Texas region runs their events with at least 4 different run groups on their stand-alone TT events. The group splits are based on class, experience and speed. They stuck me in the faster "Red" group, which had all of the CAM cars, instructors, and advanced folks. Passing is only with a point-by, which can only happen in two spots on this short course. With these smaller run groups, though, it worked fairly well.

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    I most recently ran this MSR 1.3 course back in August in Amy's FR-S (that car on 315 Rival-S tires could only muster a 1:10 lap). Before that event it was fully ten years since I ran the 1.3, and it was in an EVO X. So it took me a few sessions to re-learn this track and to make this big pony car dance around this tight circuit. I started off in the hunt (see session 2 results above) sitting in second only to a heavily modified CAM-S Corvette (which HPR built the 660 whp 468" LS engine for) and ahead of the CAM-C cars.

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  5. Fair

    Fair Go Big or Go Home

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    continued from above

    This was a somewhat blustery day, with ambient temps in the low 70s but high winds all day. Amy was there shooting pics and the Mustang ran great all day - running all five sessions without a hitch. The car could run the whole 15 minute session but I usually found my best laps in the first 5 to 7 laps. I kept getting quicker in each of the 5 sessions, even as the track warmed up - an obvious sign that I was still learning this course.

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    At one point I had fallen to 3rd in class, fighting with some light traffic in each of the earlier 4 sessions. By the 5th session they put me at the front of the grid so I could set the pace on the out lap. In the video above you can see that I had 4 traffic-free laps and found my quickest time on lap 3. Predictive timing kept flashing up 1:04.9 laps but I only managed a 1:05.448, which was a little disappointing.

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    Final results sorted by time for the 46 entrants in Time Trials

    It was good enough for 2nd place in the 11 car "combined" CAM class, and quickest of all of the CAM-C Camaros and Mustangs. Barely. Scott's similarly modded, white 2016 GT on 315 Rival-S tires was only 2 hundredths back. Overall I scored 3rd quickest out of 46 total T cars - behind two C6 Z06 Corvettes. There aren't many folks running in this TT in this region on R-compounds.

    200TW TIRES AFTER 9 WEEKENDS

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    These pics above are a good reference - this is what the RE-71R tires look like after 9 weekends and 9 months of track use (zero street use). The rears are pretty hammered, but they actually spent much of their life up front. The tires have been flipped and rotated more than once. The "fronts" still have plenty of life left in them, and if you look at the data logged in the video, they still sustain 1.25g lateral and touch 1.4g loads in spikes. Have they really fallen off that much? It would be nice to test an old set vs a new set back-to-back - only takes money!

    NASA TEXAS AND VORSHLAG ANNOUNCE STREET TIRE TIME TRIAL CHAMPIONSHIP

    This press release was sent out on Dec 21st about an experimental series of sub-classes for NASA Texas Time Trial built around a 200TW tire. For 2019 this is a Texas Region only championship that they agreed to let us try, where Vorshlag is going to provide trophies for the Street Tire competitors.

    Press Release: https://nasatx.com/nasa-texas-and-vorshlag-announce-street-tire-time-trial-championship/

    A little back story: NASA has the largest Time Trial series running in the United States, and they regularly bring in the largest, most competitive fields at dozens of events every year. NASA's "science based" ST/TT classing - where power, weight, tire widths, and aero devices have hard limits and are routinely measured - are attractive to the top level TT racers. Easy to understand, easy to build around, and easy to verify. We have written a post analyzing the 2019 ST/TT rules in detail, linked below.

    More on NASA ST/TT classing: http://www.vorshlag.com/forums/showthread.php?p=58774#post58774

    Back at the beginning of NASA TT, some competitors could win classes and even set class track records on street tires (we did a few times), but that quickly changed. It wasn't long before more top level NASA TT entries moved to a dedicated R-compound and non-DOT slicks.

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    This EVO X and this BMW both took wins and/or set TT records on street tires back in 2006-2008

    These "tire wars" have escalated, and unless you can afford to buy or win new contingency tires every time out, you have to budget $300-1000+ per weekend to stay on sticky R-compound tires. Tire costs have quickly become largest part of most Time Trial competitors' budgets. Some people have seen this tire battle play out and have opted to switch to longer wearing street tires - often with other series.

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    By 2013 we were bringing new "sticker" sets of Hoosier A6 tires, to help knock down track records

    Since those days, the number of tire options in the 200 treadwear segment of tires has grown tremendously - tires which last a lot longer than sticky R-compounds. This growth has been fueled by endurance racing groups, autocross classes, drifters, and other Time Attack groups building classes and entire series around these longer wearing street compound tires. We have been hearing from a lot of folks about tire costs, and were working on a way to bring 200TW to NASA TT. We worked with Will Faules of NASA Texas to create this experimental series of regional classes built around a 200TW limit.

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    Optima / USCA was one of the groups that built their whole series around 200TW tires - and it works

    In the new NASA Texas 200TW Championship, cars will compete in the existing TT1 to TT6 classes, but will also be scored during the event as a ‘race within a race’ for cars entered on and declaring the use of 200 UTQG rated tire. For example; a driver will still compete in TT1-6 but will declare in the morning meeting to be running on a 200TW tire. Tires will be verified by the NASA Texas Time Trial Director. It will then be noted on each results page during the day which cars are running in the 200TW sub-class. Regional season points will be awarded for these Street Tire sub-classes. Vorshlag will be presenting trophies for the podiums of these classes for every event as well as the 2019 Street Tire Season Championship.

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    This set of experimental 200TW classes should bring in new competitors and give existing TT folks a new option to compete on tires that could save them thousands of dollars per year. We are excited to see the outcome in 2019! If you are in or near Texas we welcome you to reach out and try to be a part of this. You will still need to earn a NASA Time Trial license, of course.

    WHAT'S NEXT?

    There are even more updates to show but this update is running very long. I am gong to wrap it up now with a few teaser shots if what is in store for 2019 on our car, as well as associated S550 product development.

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    The lone prototype "Auburn Pro" limited slip differential unit built for the Super 8.8" is in our hands. We are building up an all new aluminum Super 8.8" housing to use with this diff as well as 4.30:1 gears. I will show more of this next time, weights of the housings, and reasoning behind 4.30 gearing.

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    This set of ARH 1-7/8" long tubes with a catted 3" X-pipe is here and already installed on our car, but we are waiting on a CAI kit that was on backorder to arrive. When we get the car dyno tuned we are seeing how much this Gen III Coyote can make on 93 octane. Should do a bit more once it has both a free flowing inlet and exhaust.

    Until next time,
     
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  6. VoodooBoss

    VoodooBoss Rick Moderator

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    Great progress on your project Mustang GT. I like your simple tow hooks and Ockham said it best:

    “All things being equal, the simplest solution tends to be the best one.”
     
  7. Coz

    Coz TMO Race

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    VoodooBoss is being razor sharp ;-)
     
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  8. 2012-Boss

    2012-Boss TMO Addict

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    Are the 4:30 gears a new offering from Auburn? Currently the are no 4:30 gears available for the Super 8.8. If some are coming available, that would be great news for track rats.
     

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