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2012 Laguna Seca Value

vikings138

Union Boss LS 211
15
1
NY
Ok Boss 302 owners, I am looking for a general consensus on this subject, so everyone look into your crystal ball. What do you think the value of a 2012 Boss laguna Seca will be in 5 years. Now we know there are many variables so for arguement sake lets say the car has 20k miles on it with no accidents, garaged, never tracked, a babied but driven car. I am interested in what we, as Boss owners, think.
Let me know.
 
401
0
Id say 30-35K. I really dont see these car's retaining value, especially a Laguna Seca, where people are going to assume it was tracked to fulfill its purpose.
 
Look at 5 year old Shelby's with low miles and that's a good marker I think. I think $35-37k is a safe bet for a Laguna and probably $32-34k for a standard Boss. 6 year old Shelby's with low miles are still pulling mid to high 30's and there were a lot more of them made than Laguna's and their original price point is about the same.
 

four-walling

Kerry, San Diego
If somebody is hoping the 2012-13 Boss will be collectable, 20K is too many miles, in my opinion.

I am sticking with a $28K value.

See you at this thread in 5 years!

:)
 
I may be wrong, but I don't think the OP was asking if it would be collectible but rather what value his Laguna might have in 5 years with 20k miles. A 2012 LS is already 2 model years old and most are selling for around 40k used. I don't think any modern Bosses will be collectible...not like the originals were. Either way its all speculation.
 

Grant 302

basic and well known psychic
I think base Bosses will depreciate at about the same rate that the '01 Bullitts did. In 5 years, I think one would be in the $24k to $28k with 20k miles on it and mild mods. I think the LSs in the same condition would get between $29k to $33k.

The value of one-owner low mile stock cars will depend on how many are left at that point. I doubt they'll be worth much more than the high side values above.
 
IMHO a better comparison is the Cobra R. The Bullitt cars weren't a performance upgrade, or a track weapon, like the LS or the Cobra R. I also think that track time won't diminsh value, but earn credo, ala the 65 or 66 Shelby. There is a member on site who has a 2012 LS for sale, in the wrapper, that isn't discounted at all. I have one, that I won't sell for what I have in it, so perhaps the "sell" side of the equation will influence things? What would help value, more than anything, is if the 302S or 302R won more often, as it's Parnelli's story that boosted the 69 & 70 B2's, more so than the straight performance level of those cars. Just my 2 cents,
 

GB899

NO REGRETS
350
155
Nebraska
Like most "so called" future classics... the prices will drop... kids will destroy them... technology will pass them by... nostalgia will strike... prices will rebound... economy will tank... speculators will loose there shirts... then they bounce back... anniversaries will occur... and prices go back up...

but not in 5 years...

generally speaking new cars as investments will always stink...
the comments "They only cost $3250 back in the day and are worth $80,000 today" always forget you made $1.35 an hour and houses were $10,000...

drive them and enjoy... life it too short...
 

unrealford

Mustang owner since 84
521
0
Re: Re: 2012 Laguna Seca Value

GB899 said:
Like most "so called" future classics... the prices will drop... kids will destroy them... technology will pass them by... nostalgia will strike... prices will rebound... economy will tank... speculators will loose there shirts... then they bounce back... anniversaries will occur... and prices go back up...

but not in 5 years...

generally speaking new cars as investments will always stink...
the comments "They only cost $3250 back in the day and are worth $80,000 today" always forget you made $1.35 an hour and houses were $10,000...

drive them and enjoy... life it too short...
Well said..
 
cbj5259 said:
I may be wrong, but I don't think the OP was asking if it would be collectible but rather what value his Laguna might have in 5 years with 20k miles. A 2012 LS is already 2 model years old and most are selling for around 40k used. I don't think any modern Bosses will be collectible...not like the originals were. Either way its all speculation.

If you find one for 40k let me know ;D ... All I am seeing now are mostly 44k+
 
Like most "so called" future classics... the prices will drop... kids will destroy them... technology will pass them by... nostalgia will strike... prices will rebound... economy will tank... speculators will loose there shirts... then they bounce back... anniversaries will occur... and prices go back up...

but not in 5 years...

generally speaking new cars as investments will always stink...
the comments "They only cost $3250 back in the day and are worth $80,000 today" always forget you made $1.35 an hour and houses were $10,000...

drive them and enjoy... life it too short...

I agree, and it's true for 99% of new cars. The rare exception however, is the instant collectible, like the Ford GT. Nobody is selling one of those for less than they paid for them new, and that didn't take 5 yrs. I'm not saying the LS is in the same category, because the market must speak. All the elements seem to be there, but who knows...
 

Grant 302

basic and well known psychic
Fixy said:
IMHO a better comparison is the Cobra R. The Bullitt cars weren't a performance upgrade, or a track weapon, like the LS or the Cobra R. I also think that track time won't diminsh value, but earn credo, ala the 65 or 66 Shelby. There is a member on site who has a 2012 LS for sale, in the wrapper, that isn't discounted at all. I have one, that I won't sell for what I have in it, so perhaps the "sell" side of the equation will influence things? What would help value, more than anything, is if the 302S or 302R won more often, as it's Parnelli's story that boosted the 69 & 70 B2's, more so than the straight performance level of those cars. Just my 2 cents,

You're right about the LS numbers being more comparable to the Cobra Rs... except that the LSs were produced next to the base Bosses. This will ultimately keep the prices from behaving like the Rs. Functionally, the Cobra Rs are more like the 302Ss and 302Rs.

If there weren't so many LSs currently available for sale, I think their value would be significantly higher.
 
Fixy said:
Like most "so called" future classics... the prices will drop... kids will destroy them... technology will pass them by... nostalgia will strike... prices will rebound... economy will tank... speculators will loose there shirts... then they bounce back... anniversaries will occur... and prices go back up...

but not in 5 years...

generally speaking new cars as investments will always stink...
the comments "They only cost $3250 back in the day and are worth $80,000 today" always forget you made $1.35 an hour and houses were $10,000...

drive them and enjoy... life it too short...

I agree, and it's true for 99% of new cars. The rare exception however, is the instant collectible, like the Ford GT. Nobody is selling one of those for less than they paid for them new, and that didn't take 5 yrs. I'm not saying the LS is in the same category, because the market must speak. All the elements seem to be there, but who knows...

In my opinion I think that in time the 2012 and 2013 Laguna Seca cars will become very collectible and will only increase in value but not sure how long the timeline will be for that to happen and to what degree do they appreciate is very hard to determine?

I remember growing up with the '65 Shelby GT350 cars as well as many other muscle cars of the time such as the '70 and '71 Hemi Cuda's, '69 and '70 Boss Mustangs, '67 to '69 Z28 cars and many others and one of the common traits with all of these cars was that they were all based on very low production numbers.

The '65 Shelby GT350 only had 562 units built and was very unique in many ways compared to other cars of the time.

What other current Pony car (Camaro or Challenger) offers quad exhaust, rear seat delete, Recaro seats as standard equipment, Corsa tires as standard equipment, TracKey with launch control and most importantly a limited 2 year production run of supposedly 767 LS cars in 2012 and 747 LS cars in 2013 and these great cars come fully documented with certificates from Ford signed by Edsel B. Ford II? I don't think GM or Chrysler knows what an owners kit is?

I am not suggesting that these LS cars will approach '65 GT350 status but these are special limited production cars and I remember when many limited production muscle cars of the '60's and early '70's were sitting on lots everywhere back in the day with very low asking prices and now look at where they have gone.

I drive some of my cars and store some of my cars and in recent years unfortunately totalled a new generation GT500 having a little too much fun. I agree that these cars are meant to be driven but at the same time I think that history will repeat itself with respect to increased values for low mileage LS cars as it did for many limited production muscle cars in the '60's and 70's and it is just a matter of how much time it takes.

Sometimes I think we forget how special these cars are. I know I did back based on going through the muscle car era of the sixites and early seventies.

Just my 2 cents.

Harry
 
I think a better comparison would be 2003-04 "Terminator" Cobras. Those cars were mid 30's new, and production numbers were similar, and trade for low to mid 20's now with low miles and unmolested. I can see mid 30's for the Boss LS in 5 years, and high 20's for the standard Boss. Regardless of performance of the new car in '15, these cars will still be special. New Mustang GT will outperform an '03-'04 Cobra, yet the Cobra retains it's value due to a very loyal fan base. I for one don't foresee letting go of my Boss, and I think a lot of others feel the same. That alone will keep values high if not very many cars make their way to market.

I think the cars you see out for sale now are the ones who had to have the latest greatest thing, and have now moved on. Once those cars find their way to someone who truly wants and appreciates a Boss, and as more are lost to attrition, the value will hold steady.

As for the old models and their value, it is nostalgia and rarity that drive the market. I see a lot of enthusiasm when I meet fellow Boss owners at shows and/or track meets. In 20 years or so, many who did let go of the Boss may regret it and again drive the market and value up to numbers none of us thought possible. I wouldn't bank on it with my IRA money, but anything is possible.
 
LostPony said:
As for the old models and their value, it is nostalgia and rarity that drive the market. I see a lot of enthusiasm when I meet fellow Boss owners at shows and/or track meets. In 20 years or so, many who did let go of the Boss may regret it and again drive the market and value up to numbers none of us thought possible. I wouldn't bank on it with my IRA money, but anything is possible.

Not sitting on mine to see if it is worth hundreds of thousands somewhere in the future, I won't be alive that long. I am driving it and enjoying the hell out of it.
Besides, who knows what or where we will be in 20-30 years. Internal combustion outlawed, nuclear waste land, new ice age, all unknowns. Live for the now and enjoy what you have. The rest is just a crap shoot.
 

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