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Camber setting???

I just installed MM CC plates on my 2013 BOSS and was wondering what the best camber setting would be for a car that will see a combination of track days, I am a beginner, and street driving. The BOSS is not my DD. Any insight would be appreciated.
 
For maximum track tire wear you'd want -3 degrees or more. You will have to hog out the strut to spindle holes to get that much. I'd recommend at a minimum maxing out your c/c plates which should put you somewhere between -2.4 and -2.7 degrees. If it's not a DD your street tire wear will be minor. You can always flip the fronts on the rim if you start seeing excessive inner tire wear on your street tires. I did that last summer.
 
I drive mine on the street and track and I have -2.1. So far my tires are not wearing heavily on the inside.
 
Originally I was thinking about -1.5 as a compromise for street/track; however, after giving it some more thought I believe I will go max negative, w/out “hogging out” the strut towers. Running on the track will definitely induce more tire wear with less negative camber, than running on the street with more negative camber. Thanks for your inputs.

Looking forward to my first track day!
 
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i have driven lifted trucks my whole life, making all the necessary alignment changes as needed, however this was with all stock components.

does anyone have a link to how these plates work? they enable you to make the adjustments yourself, without an alignment machine?

Sorry for the noob question and not trying to hijack the thread! Thanks!
 

JScheier

Too Hot for the Boss!
stunya said:
they enable you to make the adjustments yourself, without an alignment machine?

Yes & No.

When first installed, you'll want to get the car up on an alignment rack. What most of the 'not-so-lazy' track rats do is set the outboard most setting on the camber plates (strut shaft top moved as close to the fender as possible) and mark that. At that setting set the toe to 0*. This will help prevent inner edge tire wear on the street.

Once that is done, loosen the plates and move them all the way in (strut shaft top moved as close to the motor as possible). Mark the plates (or tower) for maximum negative camber. Since the S197 is a front-steer car, when moving the plates to negative camber, it will increase the toe-out on your alignment. This will help the car turn-in, but will also lead to high-speed stability issues (dartiness, wandering).

If you are the least laziest of all, you will adjust your toe settings each time you move the plates in or out. With coarse threads, this is usually only 1-2 turns on each side to bring the toe back to zero (you can have the alignment tech measure this and mark the nuts).

Not perfect... but close enough.
 
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JScheier said:
Yes & No.

When first installed, you'll want to get the car up on an alignment rack. What most of the 'not-so-lazy' track rats do is set the outboard most setting on the camber plates (strut shaft top moved as close to the fender as possible) and mark that. At that setting set the toe to 0*. This will help prevent inner edge tire wear on the street.

Once that is done, loosen the plates and move them all the way in (strut shaft top moved as close to the motor as possible). Mark the plates (or tower) for maximum negative camber. Since the S197 is a front-steer car, when moving the plates to negative camber, it will increase the toe-out on your alignment. This will help the car turn-in, but will also lead to high-speed stability issues (dartiness, wandering).

If you are the least laziest of all, you will adjust your toe settings each time you move the plates in or out. With coarse threads, this is usually only 1-2 turns on each side to bring the toe back to zero (you can have the alignment tech measure this and mark the nuts).

Not perfect... but close enough.

interesting...i have access to an alignment machine on a limited basis. i might be able to really dial a set up like this in. Great info...ill look into it for the future. Thanks for the feedback...
 

JScheier

Too Hot for the Boss!
stunya said:
interesting...i have access to an alignment machine on a limited basis. i might be able to really dial a set up like this in. Great info...ill look into it for the future. Thanks for the feedback...

Note: Caster is adjustable too... It will not change with camber settings, so set it and forget it. I run OEM Caster settings with my Vorshlag plates without issues.
 

JScheier

Too Hot for the Boss!
LindsayEOD said:
That was some really good info John. Out of curiosity, how much camber can you get out of your Vorshlag plates?

So... camber is actually a function of a couple of things: Spring size, strut tower opening, strut tower size, and ride height.

At my ride height, with the newest Vorshlag plates (I had prototypes before), I'm at -3.2*. With the AST struts I have in the front, I can actually lay the spindle back into the strut some and get close to -4* of camber. It actually looks like I broke something.

The thing to remember... if you are running OEM springs, regardless of what camber plates you have, you won't get the degree of camber I have as the springs actually limit the range of adjustment in the strut tower. Going to a 2.5" or 60mm spring will free up room in the tower. Then adjust ride heights and see what you end up with.
 

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