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Easiest way to change fluid

I’m gonna be attending my first track day at the end of this month at Nelson ledges. And wanna change out my brake fluid since it’s 8 yrs old, is there a easy way to do this with a pump or something. I’ve done it on countless foxbodys, but they usually got new lines and etc so pretty basic procedure. Was just looking for a quicker/cleaner way for one person to do it. I wanna do pads/fluid, check tires and lug nuts, Saftey gear and anything else you can suggest. I will be in the beginner class with a instructor. So gonna get the feet wet soon in road course action.
 
If you have a compressed air source this is really convenient and clean as well. It makes bleeding and refills quick and painless. The only negative is that you have to check your master cylinder and add new fluid so you don't drain it too low but I've never done that yet.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00YF83X6G/?tag=tmo302-20
Between this system and the motive, it seems like you really can’t go wrong with either one.
 
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That Motive bleeder works perfectly. Follow the procedure and it helps having a catch bottle.

Also handy for the job: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00942XQ06/?tag=tmo302-20

A nice video to follow:
The guy in the video makes a lot of good points, but he's missed an important one - it's not in the Motive directions but it really helps: Use a turkey baster or some other tool to lower the level of brake fluid in the master cylinder reservoir before you start - get it down right to or even a bit below the "low" mark. Once it's down there, then put the cap and hose on and start pumping up the bleeder.

This accomplishes two things. First, it keeps you from mixing your new fluid with that big reservoir full of old fluid, so you get finished with less fluid used. Second, it creates a big air pocket in the reservoir, which then compresses down by about half when you pump the pressure up to 15 psi. But it doesn't go away - it stays there at that size as new fluid flows in through the top and out through the master cylinder. When you are finished and you gently release the pressure in the bleeder, that compressed air pocket expands back up into the feed hose, pushing all the fluid in the hose back into the bleeder and leaving you with a nicely sized air space at the top of the reservoir. You don't finish with fluid everywhere and the reservoir over-filled like he did.

BTW - i have a Motive and two Sealy's. I haven't used the Motive in years because the Sealy is the better product, and I have two Sealy's because one has a dead pump and it was cheaper to buy another one than to buy the pump as a spare part. If you get the Sealy with the right-angled reservoir cap, it has a short hose that sticks down into the fluid that also serves the purpose of ducting fluid out of the reservoir when you release the pressure in the bleeder. With it you don't have to lower the level the reservoir first, although, why wouldn't you?
 
The guy in the video makes a lot of good points, but he's missed an important one - it's not in the Motive directions but it really helps: Use a turkey baster or some other tool to lower the level of brake fluid in the master cylinder reservoir before you start - get it down right to or even a bit below the "low" mark. Once it's down there, then put the cap and hose on and start pumping up the bleeder.

This accomplishes two things. First, it keeps you from mixing your new fluid with that big reservoir full of old fluid, so you get finished with less fluid used. Second, it creates a big air pocket in the reservoir, which then compresses down by about half when you pump the pressure up to 15 psi. But it doesn't go away - it stays there at that size as new fluid flows in through the top and out through the master cylinder. When you are finished and you gently release the pressure in the bleeder, that compressed air pocket expands back up into the feed hose, pushing all the fluid in the hose back into the bleeder and leaving you with a nicely sized air space at the top of the reservoir. You don't finish with fluid everywhere and the reservoir over-filled like he did.

BTW - i have a Motive and two Sealy's. I haven't used the Motive in years because the Sealy is the better product, and I have two Sealy's because one has a dead pump and it was cheaper to buy another one than to buy the pump as a spare part. If you get the Sealy with the right-angled reservoir cap, it has a short hose that sticks down into the fluid that also serves the purpose of ducting fluid out of the reservoir when you release the pressure in the bleeder. With it you don't have to lower the level the reservoir first, although, why wouldn't you?
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Will do what you recommend. Any suggestions for types of pads you or other people run? My car is all stock and will be on the street 80 percent of the time and rest track time. I might add a full exhaust and tune in the future so won’t be making goofy power. Me personally, I will never get close to reaching the cars potential even in stock form. So I don’t see the need for all that extra hp especially on the street, seems a little wasted. I’ve had some 5-600hp foxbodies before, and it wasn’t manageable until 3rd gear and usually on the freeway. I just don’t wanna throw on a super aggressive pad for something that’s mainly street driven. I’m thinking some hawks.
 

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