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Heat cycle help??

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I just read an article about the proper procedure to heat cycle new tires. ? The article basically said to run them for 10-15 minutes gradually bringing them up to full speed in 4-7 laps. Then remove them and let them cure for a full 24 hours. Does this really help with the longevity of the tires? Or is it just myth?

Here is the article for anyone wanting to read the full version:
http://www.goaheadtakethewheel.com/blog/race-tire-heat-cycling-

Thanks!
 
Longevity. What if anything you may sacrifice in performance will be negligible and imperceptible. Unless of course your last name is either Vettel or Alonso.
 
I find this very funny. I have been road racing ( Vintage) for almost twenty years. Because to the time and money issue a couple to the times a year is all I get. I can not afford vagina footing around when I get time on the track, too few per weekend and the driver needs all the at speed time he can get. Besides I have never corded the tires and have to throw them away after three or four cylcles or the end of year. They have gone rock hard by then and are only good for keeping the car off the ground in the garage. I am not a drifter and I drive smoooooth and fast, very compeditive, others can ruin a set of tires in one session. They need to learn to drive or go pro.
 
emcrace, I am not quite sure what you are trying to say here. Btw, I should have also added that it depends on the car and the tires you are using.
 
I found it helped (a lot) with the NT05's I ran to heat cycle. Some people say it does not matter too much but I saw the difference.

I put a fresh set on the car and run one full session. Then take them off let some air out and let them cure until the next event. 24 Hours is minimum, a week or more is better. Only problem with this is you need an extra set of rims and tires, however it is always nice to have a back-up set anyway. If you cut a tire without them you day/weekend is over.
 

Dvendet

Everyone's entitled to my opinion. ;)
Jza1736 said:
I just read an article about the proper procedure to heat cycle new tires. ? The article basically said to run them for 10-15 minutes gradually bringing them up to full speed in 4-7 laps. Then remove them and let them cure for a full 24 hours. Does this really help with the longevity of the tires? Or is it just myth?

Here is the article for anyone wanting to read the full version:
http://www.goaheadtakethewheel.com/blog/race-tire-heat-cycling-

Thanks!
Hmmm... So you actually think that a tire manufacturer is going to offer in the market place a tire that has not been fully cured? This is absolutely insane! There are too many liability issues associated doing this never mind a manufacturer's reputation on the line. Look what happened to Firestone in the 70's and 90's when they manufactured and distributed OEM tires that failed on numerous vehicles and the millions of dollars lost in lawsuits that resulted, and lives lost. Manufacturers are not going to send tires out the door if they cannot perform from day one. Tires are designed to perform at there best when they get up to their normal operating temperature. A manufacturer will not expect a customer to perform a curing process on their tires before they can be used for their intended purpose- in this case racing. Curing tires at the track is an urban myth. If you still don't believe this then write a letter to your favorite tire company and ask their customer service rep. They'll be glad to enlighten you on their products.
 
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1
MakeMyDay said:
Hmmm... So you actually think that a tire manufacturer is going to offer in the market place a tire that has not been fully cured? This is absolutely insane! There are too many liability issues associated doing this never mind a manufacturer's reputation on the line. Look what happened to Firestone in the 70's and 90's when they manufactured and distributed OEM tires that failed on numerous vehicles and the millions of dollars lost in lawsuits that resulted, and lives lost. Manufacturers are not going to send tires out the door if they cannot perform from day one. Tires are designed to perform at there best when they get up to their normal operating temperature. A manufacturer will not expect a customer to perform a curing process on their tires before they can be used for their intended purpose- in this case racing. Curing tires at the track is an urban myth. If you still don't believe this then write a letter to your favorite tire company and ask their customer service rep. They'll be glad to enlighten you on their products.

Did you even read the article.....??? Or have any idea what you are talking about....??? You may want to do some more research.... Initial heat cycling procedure described by the OP are for race tires, not street tires, for the track not public roads. It is so well known to work that you can buy race tires already initially heat cycled so you don't have to for about $15-$20 more per tire. This is for pure life longevity for tracked tires.... Good luck suing a tire manufacturer if something happens to your tires while on the track. ::)
 

Dvendet

Everyone's entitled to my opinion. ;)
adam81 said:
Did you even read the article.....??? Or have any idea what you are talking about....??? You may want to do some more research.... Initial heat cycling procedure described by the OP is for race tires, not street tires, for the track not public roads. It is so well known to work that you can buy race tires already initially heat cycled so you don't have to for about $15-$20 more per tire. This is for pure life longevity for tracked tires.... Good luck suing a tire manufacturer if something happens to your tires while on the track. ::)

"It is morally wrong to allow a sucker to keep his money."- W. C. Fields

Boy have you been brain washed.
 

Dvendet

Everyone's entitled to my opinion. ;)
adam81 said:
Did you even read the article.....??? Or have any idea what you are talking about....??? You may want to do some more research.... Initial heat cycling procedure described by the OP is for race tires, not street tires, for the track not public roads. It is so well known to work that you can buy race tires already initially heat cycled so you don't have to for about $15-$20 more per tire. This is for pure life longevity for tracked tires.... Good luck suing a tire manufacturer if something happens to your tires while on the track. ::)
Hey Adam - I got a deal for you. I have some special stones I obtained from the jungles of Africa. If you put them in your car at the race track, they are guarenteed to increase your top end by 25 MPH and increase your horsepower by 30HP! These stones have been widely used by some of the best auto racers in the world. I normally sell these stones for $150 each but for you I'll sell you 2 for the low price of $75.
 

Bill Pemberton

0ld Ford Automotive Racing Terror
5,410
3,896
Exp. Type
W2W Racing
Exp. Level
20+ Years
Blair, Nebraska
Having tested tires for various manufacturers over the years I can honestly say that many of the engineers recommended heat cycling the tires prior to a race. The funny thing, to me, is no one questions bedding in brake pads ( heat cycling them ) for better longevity, but then they question a similar process for tires.

It is not a legal issue , it is just a common sense suggestion for certain tires to help extend the wear a bit. You do see race teams talking about putting on scuffed tires at some tracks and did you wonder why?

The problem with this situation is that some folks think it will dramatically lengthen the time the tire will last, when it will usually give you more life, but it is not going to be earth shattering. Never worried about doing it with Toyo R1s when I ran them, but always have tried to do it with Hoosiers. Pretty good idea on Kumho 710s too, but doubt it is a big advantage for the Pirelli Corsas ( IMHO ). Alot of the process has to do with compounding and like anything else if the manufacturer suggests or a supplier suggests, for a specific brand, it is usually somewhat beneficial.

There is also the inherent example of seeing tires at the track that were brand new, and ones that were scrubbed on another car, yet essentially just out of the box too. Can remember many a time when in a 35 -40 minute SCCA race where late in the race on a hot Midwestern day , some tires really were going off. Seen same brands where fresh ones look like they have been through the wringer and scrubbed rubber looked much fresher. Listening to tire engineers mumble about molecules in the rubber and the temperature gradients needed to further cure a tire for longevity, I just went with it was good to do.Hearing the rubberlitic osmatic formulated molecule bedded itself with the transposed cylindrical layers of steel meshing and a unique nylon crosshatching causing a thermobonded spontaneous solid material mating process at a temperature elevated through the systematic driving technique known as heat cycling, I wandered off and got a beer.

In closing , if you have time to do it and it is recommended for the black donut, do it. If it is not even mentioned , then rock and roll and skip it. As for methods, many of us use a modified method on the street/highway, and just don't go as fast , of course.
 
Forgive me. I can not afford the time and money to season a set of tires ( race tires) for two or three dayes later. Yes that is the effective time interval. If I track a new set Saturday up to temp and pull in and take them off till Sunday, yes they are better in almost all respects. Now reality for us working stiffs. Blow Saturday fun track time to season tires? Not me. Go out Sunday morning on old hard tires to save my good ones for the later main event. Not me. Now if I scrub a set in and save them for the next event that I can attend They have turned into rocks.
Here is the summary on performance tires. The softer the more stick. To make them softer cure them less and delete some hardening chemicals. From the day they are made they continue to cure every day. With out heat they take thier time. With a heat cycle they soften while hot and cure rapidly as they cool. Every time.
It has been said that you can buy seasoned tires. Yes two ways. Buy used that sombody else got the goodie out if them, or buy the next harder compound. The next harder is the best for most of us. Go like hell all weekend. More consistant, age slower and do not drop off as bad at the end of the race. You will reel in the boys that have cooked thier softies when it counts. The heavier the car the more this is true.
 

Bill Pemberton

0ld Ford Automotive Racing Terror
5,410
3,896
Exp. Type
W2W Racing
Exp. Level
20+ Years
Blair, Nebraska
Reality sets in for alot of us, as hard to get to the track and then wait 24 hours prior to going on the track.

Have known alot of guys that for years realized the same thing alot have figured out here - tough to do at the track unless one has multiple sets of tires, a trailer, and are there for 2-3 days.

So, off to the streets and highways of America. No need to really drive super fast but you can get heat into the tires by some fairly strong launches , some hard stops and driving up to speed , then cooling down to lower speeds. Did it last night, as I drove to a car show about 15 miles away, part way on a winding road. Checked traffic and did some hard stops , and then drove home after the event. Have about 30 miles on the tires and they will sit for over 24 hours prior to my event. Perfect situation, no, but then when the major distributors heat cycle tires for you they obviously can not drive the car at all. Have done this for years , with the tires that suggested a heat cycle, and have always had pretty good luck with my tires lasting a bit longer -- but also being a bit more consistent on the track.

Plus I will drive to where I am running on Sunday --- not all the time, but will do it this weekend.
 
So basically an aggressive pad bedding procedure will do the tires too?

I drive to the track on my 888s on my track car and I also play with it on the street sometimes. They have fallen off a lot since new, they still stick well initially but get greasy sooner.
 

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