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Front hub frozen

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55
47
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
Under 3 Years
South Carolina
Swapping out OEM for Ford Racing at 82K miles. This is a simple job, but not easy for a formerly skinny 69-year-old. First one was not bad, but the passenger side is frozen. It's sitting in blaster until tomorrow. If the blaster doesn't work, what's next? Hammer (already tried gently)? Pry bar (ditto)? Torch? Beside the wheel speed sensor, anything to watch out for if beast mode is required? Thanks.
 

xr7

TMO Addict?
717
840
Exp. Type
Autocross
Exp. Level
10-20 Years
Minnesota
Nut is off. Hub turns but won't move off the spindle.
You need a three legged puller or the other option is a slide hammer for pulling axles. This type of slide hammer set up has a flange that will slide over the wheel studs, put some nuts on the studs and start banging away. I prefer the three legged puller. the legs grab the hub and the center screw pushed on the spindle. A two legged puller can be used but they have a tendency to start leaning if things are very tight.
 
55
47
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
Under 3 Years
South Carolina
You need a three legged puller or the other option is a slide hammer for pulling axles. This type of slide hammer set up has a flange that will slide over the wheel studs, put some nuts on the studs and start banging away. I prefer the three legged puller. the legs grab the hub and the center screw pushed on the spindle. A two legged puller can be used but they have a tendency to start leaning if things are very tight.
Good--and bad. The good is that TMO once again has reminded me of lessons from my teens and twenties working on cars. When I read xr7's post my reaction was Doh! Of course I should use a gear puller. And for $12.99 at HF it did the trick, sort of. Now the bad: I managed to pull the outside half of the hub assembly. The inside half is still frozen to the spindle, with nothing for the ears of the puller to grip (or bolts for a slide hammer). Here are pix of the hub successfully removed next to the one that is half off; and of the remainder of the hub still on the spindle.20240204_134952.jpgspindle.jpg Unless I'm missing something, I think my option now is to remove the spindle and take it to the machine shop. At least I will have an excuse to replace the tie rod ends.

Thanks to all who responded--you are a great help to one who knows (mostly) what he doesn't know!
 

TMSBOSS

Spending my pension on car parts and track fees.
7,547
5,275
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
10-20 Years
Illinois
Not sure what tools you have available. If you have a grinder that can cut into the bad bearing you have some options. You could grind flats on the searing bearing and break it loose with A pipe wrench. You could also hit the bearing with an air chisel to break It loose. With a welder you could add a piece of metal to the bearing which could then be turned or hammered off.
 
6,394
8,272
Agreed,you are on semi beast mode. Try the pipe wrench and very large piece of tubing first. If that doesn't go, then try
" cracking" The race via chisel or other form of weaponry, at that point the death wheel ( carbide cutter with guard removed) would be the next option.
Somewhere at this point you must recognize the fact that the race has actually welded itself on to the stub axle, simply corroded on is not likely and you are approaching the realm of diminishing returns.
Be prepared to replace the spindle at this point.
 

Dave_W

Cones - not just for ice cream
1,000
1,304
Exp. Type
Autocross
Exp. Level
20+ Years
Connecticut
Have you tried the flame wrench? Heat the bearing race with a torch as much as you can, then whack it with a hammer a few times to try to shock the interface of the race to the stub axle. As TMSBoss said, try using a pipe wrench to rotate it free at that point. Heating a circular part like the race should make it larger, so it wants to grow away from the stub axle. Only downside is if the stub axle is heat-treated, heating it up with a torch and letting it air-cool may anneal it.

Looks like you might be able to use a cold chisel as a wedge between the back of the race and the spindle/knuckle, moving around the diameter of the race (e.g., 12 o'clock, 6, 3, 9, back to 12 and repeat).
 
55
47
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
Under 3 Years
South Carolina
Not sure what tools you have available. If you have a grinder that can cut into the bad bearing you have some options. You could grind flats on the searing bearing and break it loose with A pipe wrench. You could also hit the bearing with an air chisel to break It loose. With a welder you could add a piece of metal to the bearing which could then be turned or hammered off.
I'll try the pipe wrench with a comealong. other suggestions are outside my limited tool- or skill-set. thank you!
 
55
47
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
Under 3 Years
South Carolina
Agreed,you are on semi beast mode. Try the pipe wrench and very large piece of tubing first. If that doesn't go, then try
" cracking" The race via chisel or other form of weaponry, at that point the death wheel ( carbide cutter with guard removed) would be the next option.
Somewhere at this point you must recognize the fact that the race has actually welded itself on to the stub axle, simply corroded on is not likely and you are approaching the realm of diminishing returns.
Be prepared to replace the spindle at this point.
Yeah, kinda figured I might be looking at a new spindle. Will try pipe + pipe wrench first. Thanks, BS1.
 
55
47
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
Under 3 Years
South Carolina
Have you tried the flame wrench? Heat the bearing race with a torch as much as you can, then whack it with a hammer a few times to try to shock the interface of the race to the stub axle. As TMSBoss said, try using a pipe wrench to rotate it free at that point. Heating a circular part like the race should make it larger, so it wants to grow away from the stub axle. Only downside is if the stub axle is heat-treated, heating it up with a torch and letting it air-cool may anneal it.

Looks like you might be able to use a cold chisel as a wedge between the back of the race and the spindle/knuckle, moving around the diameter of the race (e.g., 12 o'clock, 6, 3, 9, back to 12 and repeat).
If a pipe wrench doesn't work I'm likely looking at a new spindle anyway, so I might try the flame wrench. Thanks!
 
55
47
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
Under 3 Years
South Carolina
Heat it but don't get crazy, it will come off.
A small bearing puller would help a lot.
Thanks. I might try heat. Currently there is zero daylight between the race and spindle, so I'm not sure a bearing puller would work. But if I can get it to move a little bit....
 
Back to Harbor Freight, get a bearing separator.
The bearing likely has enough of a radius on the back shoulder for this to start between bearing and spindle shoulder. Just need to get it to start and "crack" the corrosion in the joint that has frozen your bearing on.

1707153963786.png
 
179
67
ny
I have set of new in the ford boxes from ford racing spindles . Mag and x-ray checked by ford . These are from multimatic used on fr500c cars 19mm ball joint. 350 + shipping.
If 09 car then they fit. If boss car they won't fit. They use 21 mm balk joint. Chris
[email protected]
 

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